American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Meeting

American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Meeting

Source:

Goldenfeld M. Automated direct selective laser trabeculoplasty: First-in-human prospective clinical study. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery meeting; July 23-27, 2021; Las Vegas.

Disclosures: Goldenfeld reports relevant financial disclosure for Belkin Laser.
July 25, 2021
1 min read
Save

Automated direct SLT demonstrates safety, efficacy in first human trial

Source:

Goldenfeld M. Automated direct selective laser trabeculoplasty: First-in-human prospective clinical study. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery meeting; July 23-27, 2021; Las Vegas.

Disclosures: Goldenfeld reports relevant financial disclosure for Belkin Laser.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

LAS VEGAS — Automated direct selective laser trabeculoplasty appears to reduce IOP in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, according to a speaker here.

“This initial trial demonstrated safety and a signal of efficacy,” Yoram Solberg, MD, PhD, said at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery meeting.

Yoram Solberg

Solberg and colleagues conducted a prospective, single-arm, nonrandomized, masked clinical trial to evaluate automated direct SLT in 15 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension or pseudoexfoliation. The primary outcome measure was the mean percentage reduction in IOP from baseline to 3 months. Secondary outcomes included change from baseline to 6 months and change in number of medications from baseline to 6 months.

Patients had a 21.4% IOP reduction at 3 months (P < .05) and an 18.8% reduction at 6 months (P < .01). The mean number of hypotensive medications was 1.6 at baseline and 0.4 at 6 months.

There were no serious or sight-threatening adverse events, and there were four punctate “non-clinically significant subconjunctival hemorrhages,” Solberg said.

“The laser treatment takes about 2 seconds — that’s it. It’s very simple, and anyone actually can do it. You don’t need to be a glaucoma expert,” he said. “This calls for a confirmatory study.”

Enrollment in the GLAUrious trial concluded in April 2021, and primary endpoint results are anticipated in January 2022, Solberg said.

Editor's note: On July 26, 2021, this article was corrected to correctly identify Yoram Solberg, MD, PhD, as the speaker. Healio editors regret this error.