Hawaiian Eye/Retina Meeting

Hawaiian Eye/Retina Meeting

Source:

Healio Interviews

Disclosures: Kim reports she is a retina program director for Retina 2021. Lindstrom reports he is the anterior segment meeting program chair for Hawaiian Eye 2021.
April 05, 2021
2 min read
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Hawaiian Eye and Retina 2021 mark return of in-person medical meetings

Source:

Healio Interviews

Disclosures: Kim reports she is a retina program director for Retina 2021. Lindstrom reports he is the anterior segment meeting program chair for Hawaiian Eye 2021.
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Hawaiian Eye and Retina 2021 are set to mark the return to large in-person medical meetings for many physicians since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The meetings are scheduled for May 8 to 14 on Maui.

Organizers, venue staff and meeting faculty have worked to create a safe and valuable experience for ophthalmologists, beginning with holding more open-air sessions.

Richard L. Lindstrom

“Hawaiian Eye will offer an open-air environment this year, like we have been utilizing in past meetings for the breakfast and lunch symposia and, of course, for our recreational activities,” Richard L. Lindstrom, MD, the anterior segment meeting program chair and OSN Chief Medical Editor, said. “I won’t be surprised if many of us would like to go back and do it that way again even next year when we may not have to.”

“The pandemic is still ongoing, but if you had to pick one place that may be the safest place to have a meeting like this, it would be Hawaii,” Judy E. Kim, MD, said. Kim and Rishi P. Singh, MD, program directors for Retina 2021, are taking over for Jay S. Duker, MD, and Elias Reichel, MD.

Judy E. Kim

Hawaiian Eye is worthwhile for ophthalmologists because it offers a comprehensive update and touches on every subject, Lindstrom said. In addition to the Hawaiian Eye and Retina programs, the new Subspecialty Saturday for the Comprehensive Ophthalmologist will include medical retina, uveitis, ocular oncology, neuro‐ophthalmology and oculoplastics.

Ophthalmologists who cannot attend in person will be able to access the program virtually. Virtual attendees will be able to watch presentations live, submit questions in real time and earn CME credits from the meeting. The meeting will be archived online for 90 days.

“We have a fantastic lineup of faculty, many of whom are new to this meeting this year, and we are fortunate to have them join us. Of course, we also have the ‘seasoned’ faculty who have received outstanding evaluations from the attendees over the years,” Kim said.

Throughout the programs, directors incorporated a variety of sessions to foster interactivity among attendees and faculty, Kim said.

“Through different manners of presentations for improved learning, such as the case presentations, didactic sessions, panel discussions, debates, ample time for question and answer sessions, and informal small group learning sessions, we hope to generate vigorous and informative discussions and an educational learning environment, and hope to involve the attendees as much as possible,” she said.

The May meeting dates give attendees more time to explore the island and participate in recreational activities and visit the open restaurants, Lindstrom said.

Hawaiian Eye and Retina 2021 are organized by Healio Live, a sister company of Healio, publisher of Ocular Surgery News.