Disclosures: Muzychuk reports he receives research grant funding from Bausch Health. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
January 21, 2021
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Ocular surface disease common in glaucoma but may not be adequately managed

Disclosures: Muzychuk reports he receives research grant funding from Bausch Health. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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Ocular surface disease is a common glaucoma comorbidity, but only a small percentage of respondents among the Canadian Glaucoma Society believe it is adequately managed, according to a study.

“Ophthalmologists subspecializing in glaucoma overwhelmingly agreed in this cross‐sectional, survey‐based study that comprehensive management of OSD may lead to improved QOL and glaucoma‐related outcomes, while only a small percentage felt it was presently being adequately managed,” study co-author Adam Muzychuk, MD, told Healio/OSN.

Researchers contacted members of the Canadian Glaucoma Society with fellowship training in glaucoma to participate in a cross-sectional survey-based study. Researchers recorded 36 responses primarily structured in the format of a 7-point Likert scale, ranging from “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree.”

Every respondent agreed that comprehensive care of ocular surface disease could improve quality of life, and 97.1% agreed that comprehensive care could lead to better glaucoma outcomes. Only 22.2% agreed that ocular surface disease is being adequately managed in glaucoma practices.

“While nearly all respondents reported they felt knowledgeable with some aspects of management, such as optimizing topical therapies, using artificial tears and lid hygiene measures, only approximately 60% felt knowledgeable with respect to the deployment of immunomodulators, topical steroids and omega supplements, while just over 30% felt knowledgeable with respect to the use of serum tears,” Muzychuk said. “Given that management of OSD in glaucoma crosses the borders of traditional ophthalmology subspecialty practice, it is perhaps unsurprising that nearly all (92%) respondents agreed that a suggested algorithm for the treatment of OSD in glaucoma could improve their approach to management.”

In response, the authors presented a suggested treatment algorithm for OSD in glaucoma in five steps: optimize topical glaucoma therapies; promote ocular surface health; enhance ocular surface therapy; stabilize the ocular surface; and intervene surgically.