American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Meeting
American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Meeting
May 06, 2019
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3D visualization in cataract surgery compares with traditional method

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Bradley P. O'Neill

SAN DIEGO — New technology is available that provides “heads-up” 3D visualization, eliminating the need to look through the oculars, according to a speaker.

“The benefits of this include improved ergonomics, high magnification optics, digital guidance systems that can be implemented in association with it, as well as collaboration with colleagues and educating residents and fellows,” Bradley P. O’Neill, DO, said at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting.

O’Neill and colleagues at the Eye Institute of West Florida compared use of a 3D visualization system with traditional binocular microscope to evaluate the safety and efficiency of performing cataract surgery using the heads-up system.

The 1-year retrospective chart review included 1,573 eyes that underwent cataract surgery by a single experienced surgeon using either the TrueVision 3D visualization system (TrueVision Systems) and 617 eyes that underwent cataract surgery using traditional visualization. Surgical technique was either femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery or traditional cataract surgery with no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding surgical technique.

Outcome measures were duration of surgery to determine efficiency and complication rate to determine safety. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups for either measure.

Mean surgical time in the 3D group was 6.48 minutes and in the traditional oculars group was 6.52. Twelve complications were encountered in the 3D group and five were encountered in the oculars group (0.76% vs. 0.81%). Complications in both groups included posterior capsular rupture and vitreous prolapse.

“The current cohort demonstrates that heads up cataract surgery through a 3D visualization display has similar safety and efficiency to the ocular view,” O’Neill said. “Implementation of this technology may overcome work-related disabilities and provide a new educational tool in ophthalmology.” – by Patricia Nale, ELS

 

Reference: O’Neill BP. Heads-up cataract surgery: Complication rates, surgical duration, and comparison with traditional microscopes. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting; May 3-7, 2019; San Diego.

Disclosure: O’Neill reports no relevant financial disclosures.