Issue: June 25, 2017
Perspective from Roberto Warman, MD
Source:

Beato J, et al. J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017;doi:10.3928/01913913-20161013-02.

May 24, 2017
1 min read
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Success of nasolacrimal probing not affected by age or surgeon experience

Issue: June 25, 2017
Perspective from Roberto Warman, MD
Source:

Beato J, et al. J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017;doi:10.3928/01913913-20161013-02.

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The success rate of nasolacrimal probing for congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction was 77.3% after first probing and more than 90% after second probing, according to a study.

The retrospective case series included 88 eyes of 62 patients between the ages of 1 month and 138 months at Centro Hospitalar São João, Porto, Portugal. Successful nasolacrimal probing was defined as effective lacrimal irrigation intraoperatively and resolution of epiphora at 1 month.

After first probing, 77.3% of the procedures were declared a success, and there were no statistically significant differences in the success rate regarding age, gender, laterality or experience of the surgeon. Surgical success decreased in children older than 4 years to 57%, but the difference between children younger than 4 years and older than 4 years was not statistically significant.

After second probing, the success rate increased to 90.9%. Persistent nasolacrimal obstruction occurred in about 30% of patients, with adenoid hypertrophy requiring surgical correction. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosure: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.