Perspective from Bonnie An Henderson, MD
Source: Ophthalmology 2014;121(1):25-33.
January 30, 2014
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Lower-concentration NSAID reduces pain, inflammation after cataract surgery

Perspective from Bonnie An Henderson, MD
Source: Ophthalmology 2014;121(1):25-33.
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Bromfenac ophthalmic solution 0.07% dosed once daily reduced intraocular inflammation and pain after cataract surgery when compared with placebo, according to a study.

In two prospective, double-masked, phase 3 clinical trials, 222 patients randomized to receive once-daily Prolensa (bromfenac ophthalmic solution 0.07%, Bausch + Lomb) experienced less pain and inflammation and fewer adverse events than did 218 patients randomized to receive placebo.

The dosing regimen was followed for 16 days: one drop the day before cataract surgery with posterior chamber IOL implantation, one drop the day of surgery and one drop each day for 14 days afterward.

A statistically significant higher percentage of patients in the bromfenac group (48.6%) attained total clearance of ocular inflammation by day 15 than did patients in the placebo group (24.3%, P < .0001). The percentage of patients in the bromfenac group who were pain-free at day 1 postoperatively was also statistically significantly higher (78.8% vs. 49.5%, P < .0001).

Ocular pain, foreign body sensation, anterior chamber inflammation, blurred vision and photophobia were reported as adverse events in the bromfenac group. Overall, 35.6% of patients experienced an adverse event, although the rate was lower in patients in the bromfenac group (28.8%) than in the placebo group (42.6%).

Disclosure: See the study for a full list of all authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

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