November 27, 2013
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Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery linked to increased prostaglandin levels

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Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery was associated with increased prostaglandin concentrations in the aqueous humor, according to a study.

Four studies were conducted; 113 patients underwent femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery, and 107 patients underwent conventional phacoemulsification and served as controls.

After femtosecond laser pretreatment and at the beginning of conventional surgery, the investigators collected aqueous humor samples. Total prostaglandin and prostaglandin E2 concentrations were measured with an enzyme-linked immunoassay.

Results of two studies showed that prostaglandin levels were significantly higher in patients who underwent femtosecond laser surgery than those who had conventional surgery.

In study 1, prostaglandin levels were 182.1 pg/mL in the study group and 17.3 pg/mL in the control group (P = .0001).

In study 2, prostaglandin levels were 377.1 pg/mL in the study group and 17.5 pg/mL in the control group (P = .00004).

Two studies also showed prostaglandin E2 levels were significantly higher in patients who underwent femtosecond laser surgery than those who had conventional surgery.

In study 3, prostaglandin E2 levels were 19.2 pg/mL in the study group and 4.5 pg/mL in the control group (P = .0002).

In study 4, prostaglandin E2 levels were 60.3 pg/mL in the study group and 11.3 pg/mL in the control group (P = .004).

There were no correlations regarding prostaglandin or prostaglandin E2 concentrations and age, cataract density, corneal incision procedure, suction time or laser time.

The study authors suggested possibly pretreating patients with NSAIDs before femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery to reduce the risk of inflammation and intraoperative miosis.

Disclosure: Dick was a member of OptiMedica’s medical advisory board. The remaining authors have no relevant financial disclosures.

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