June 19, 2013
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Monoclonal antibody fails to meet efficacy endpoints for noninfectious uveitis

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Secukinumab fell short of primary efficacy endpoints in the treatment of noninfectious uveitis, according to the results of three clinical trials.

Data were culled from the phase 3 SHIELD, INSURE and ENDURE studies. The SHIELD study included 118 patients, the INSURE study included 31 patients, and the ENDURE study included 125 patients.

After a subcutaneous loading phase in each treatment arm, patients received subcutaneous maintenance therapy with secukinumab 300 mg every 2 weeks, secukinumab 300 mg monthly or placebo in the SHIELD study; secukinumab 300 mg every 2 weeks, secukinumab 300 mg monthly, secukinumab 150 mg monthly or placebo in the INSURE study; or secukinumab 300 mg every 2 weeks, secukinumab 300 mg monthly, secukinumab 150 mg monthly or placebo in the ENDURE study.

The secukinumab and placebo groups had similar rates of uveitis recurrence in each study. A reduction in mean total post-baseline immunosuppressive medication scores was associated with secukinumab in the SHIELD study (P = .019). Visual acuity loss was not reported in any treatment group in any study.

The secukinumab groups had slightly higher rates of ocular and non-ocular adverse events than the placebo groups in all three studies.