Perspective from Andrew W. Murphy, MD, FAAAAI
Perspective from Tom Ferkol, MD
June 03, 2014
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EPA: Clean Power Plan proposal could cut asthma attacks in children

Perspective from Andrew W. Murphy, MD, FAAAAI
Perspective from Tom Ferkol, MD
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The EPA has released the Clean Power Plan proposal, which would cut carbon pollution from existing power plants and help curtail premature deaths and asthma attacks in children, according to a press release.

There currently are no national limits on carbon pollution levels, and power plants are the single largest contributor to this pollution nationwide, according to the EPA release. The CDC reports that exposure to particle pollution may cause worsening asthma symptoms, breathing problems, adverse birth outcomes, lung cancer and early death.

Kathleen Sebelius 

Kathleen Sebelius

“With more than 25 million Americans, including more than 6.5 million children, living with asthma, and countless others suffering from the health effects of carbon pollution and climate change, we must act,” outgoing Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said in a separate release.

Under the EPA’s proposed guidelines, by 2030 up to 6,600 premature deaths could be avoided, as well as 150,000 asthma attacks in children and up to 490,000 missed work or school days. This, in turn, would provide up to $93 billion in climate and public health benefits, according to the agency.

The EPA’s proposal would be implemented through a state-federal partnership under which states use either current or new electricity production and pollution control policies to meet plan objectives, the release stated.

Comments on the proposal will be accepted by the EPA for 120 days after it is published in the Federal Register, and public hearings are scheduled in four cities during the week of July 28. The EPA said it will finalize plans, based on input, in June 2015.