Meeting NewsVideo

VIDEO: Meeting offers insights into application of CAR T-cell therapy for hematologic malignancies

NEW YORK — In this video commentary from HemOnc Today New York, program co-chair David L. Porter, MD, discusses some of the take-home messages from the meeting as they relate to treatment of hematologic malignancies.

The FDA has approved two chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies, one for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia aged 25 years or younger, and another for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and other subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Several presenters at the meeting described the efficacy of these agents, their associated toxicities, and appropriate strategies for toxicity management.

“When people get back to the office Monday morning, they should have a better understanding of the application of CAR T cells, who the appropriate patients are, and how and when to make the appropriate referrals,” said Porter, director of the cell therapy and transplant program at University of Pennsylvania. “I think that that will open up a whole new treatment modality for these patients who previously were really running out of effective treatment options.”

Disclosure: Porter reports intellectual property interests with Novartis.

NEW YORK — In this video commentary from HemOnc Today New York, program co-chair David L. Porter, MD, discusses some of the take-home messages from the meeting as they relate to treatment of hematologic malignancies.

The FDA has approved two chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies, one for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia aged 25 years or younger, and another for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and other subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Several presenters at the meeting described the efficacy of these agents, their associated toxicities, and appropriate strategies for toxicity management.

“When people get back to the office Monday morning, they should have a better understanding of the application of CAR T cells, who the appropriate patients are, and how and when to make the appropriate referrals,” said Porter, director of the cell therapy and transplant program at University of Pennsylvania. “I think that that will open up a whole new treatment modality for these patients who previously were really running out of effective treatment options.”

Disclosure: Porter reports intellectual property interests with Novartis.

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