American Transplant Congress

American Transplant Congress

Source:

Swanson KJ. et al. Abstract 200. Presented at: American Transplant Congress; June 4-8, 2022; Boston (hybrid meeting).

Disclosures: Swanson reports no relevant financial disclosures.
June 09, 2022
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Early graft survival seen with HIV-positive deceased donor kidneys in positive recipients

Source:

Swanson KJ. et al. Abstract 200. Presented at: American Transplant Congress; June 4-8, 2022; Boston (hybrid meeting).

Disclosures: Swanson reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Kidney transplant recipients with HIV who receive kidneys from deceased donors with HIV show positive overall and allograft survival, according to a presentation at the American Transplant Congress.

“We sought to address the viability/safety in terms of graft and patient survival of deceased donor kidney transplantation from HIV-positive donors to HIV-positive recipients,” Kurtis J. Swanson, MD, assistant professor of medicine in the division of nephrology and hypertension at the University of Minnesota, told Healio.

Swanson and colleagues examined all primary adult kidney transplant recipients in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, then categorized them based on donor HIV status. The two groups included HIV recipient-positive/donor-positive individuals (n=152) and HIV recipient-positive/donor-negative individuals (n=1,561). Researchers compared the characteristics of recipients and donors. Patient and death-censored graft survival by donor HIV status were considered the primary outcome.

Researchers determined HIV-positive donors were more likely to be male, “non-white” and younger compared with HIV-negative donors. Compared with the HIV recipient-positive/donor-positive group, the HIV recipient-positive/donor-negative group experienced longer dialysis vintage, more frequent hepatitis C co-infections and steroid-based maintenance immunosuppression.

The Kaplan-Meier analysis for survival revealed no significant difference in 1-year survival between groups, and the 1-year death censored kidney graft survival was similar. However, delayed graft function was less frequent among the HIV recipient-positive/donor-positive group than the HIV recipient-positive/donor-negative group.

“Deceased donor kidney transplantation from HIV-positive donors to HIV-positive recipients appears to be safe and may serve to increase the donor pool and shorten wait times for HIV-positive recipient candidates,” Swanson told Healio. “We hope to pursue future studies with longer follow-up to better understand pertinent transplant outcomes in the HIV-positive recipient population.”