American Transplant Congress

American Transplant Congress

Source:

Krishnamoorthy S. Live kidney donation. Presented at: American Transplant Congress; June 4 - June 9, 2021. (Virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Krishnamoorthy reports no relevant financial disclosures.
June 14, 2021
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Greater rates of child-to-parent donation in Black community raise concerns over ESKD risk

Source:

Krishnamoorthy S. Live kidney donation. Presented at: American Transplant Congress; June 4 - June 9, 2021. (Virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Krishnamoorthy reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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An analysis of living kidney donations occurring since 2001 showed African American patients were more likely to receive an organ from a child, while white patients were more likely to undergo unrelated donation.

“This is significant considering the recent data that have shown increased risk for end-stage kidney disease in child-to-parent donation in the African American population,” Sambhavi Krishnamoorthy, MBBS, of the University of Chicago, said of the findings during the virtual American Transplant Congress.

child to parent kidney donation
Infographic content was derived from Krishnamoorthy S. Live kidney donation. Presented at: American Transplant Congress; June 4 - June 9, 2021. (Virtual meeting).

For the study, Krishnamoorthy and colleagues utilized the United Network for Organ Sharing database to identify living donor and recipient pairs, dividing the pairs into an African American patient (10,998 total pairs) or white (61,396 total pairs) patient cohort.

Results showed unrelated kidney donation was more common in the white-to-white patient cohort (46.7%) compared with the African American-to-African American patient cohort (25.9%), while child-to-parent was more common in the African American patient cohort (28.9% vs. 16%).

When assessing donation patterns based on the specific familial relationship, researchers found daughters represented a larger proportion of living donors in both groups, with daughters making up 15.4% of living donors in the African American pairs and 9% in the white pairs (sons accounted for 13.6% of living donors in the African American patient cohort and for 7% in the white patient cohort).

Differences were observed regarding parental relationships, with findings suggesting donation to the mother was more common than to the father in the African American patient cohort (56.6% vs. 43.4%); in contrast, donation to the father was more common in the white patient cohort (63.2% vs. 36.8%).

“We found the differences in the living donor-recipient relationships between African American and white pairs that we report in the modern era are consistent with older single-center studies,” Krishnamoorthy concluded. “There is a need here to identify the critical socioeconomic factors, cultural norms and practices that are prevalent in pre-transplant evaluation that may be associated with these findings.”