American Transplant Congress
American Transplant Congress
Source/Disclosures
Source:

Haugen A, et al. Poster #360. Presented at: American Transplant Congress; May 30 - June 1, 2020. (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Haugen reports no relevant financial disclosures.
June 08, 2020
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Diabetes diagnosis risk not increased by kidney donation

Source/Disclosures
Source:

Haugen A, et al. Poster #360. Presented at: American Transplant Congress; May 30 - June 1, 2020. (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Haugen reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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The prevalence of diabetes was not significantly increased in kidney donors long after donation when compared to healthy patients, according to study findings presented at the American Transplant Congress.

With previous study findings reporting an increased risk of hypertension and end-stage renal disease subsequent to kidney donation, further evaluation was conducted on a kidney donor cohort to assess the prevalence of diabetes, Anders Haugen, MD, Oslo University Hospital, said during the presentation.

Measuring blood glucose
Source: Adobe Stock

A total of 1,029 kidney donors and 16,084 healthy controls from the HUNT study eligible for donation from 1963 to 2008 were evaluated based on self-reported diabetes cases or on fasting glucose of more than 7 mmoL/L and non-fasting glucose of more than 11.1 mmoL/L or HbA1C of greater than 6.5% at a mean follow-up of 11 years in the donor cohort and 16 years in the healthy control cohort. To estimate the effected size, stratified logistic regression was performed on cross-sectional data.

Based on the diagnostic criteria, 4.8% of donors were diagnosed with diabetes at follow-up vs. 1.9% of control patients diagnosed at follow-up. The odds ratio for diabetes in the kidney donation cohort was 1.27.

“Self-reported diabetes was not significantly increased in donors when compared to healthy select controls eligible to be donors,” Haugen concluded. “This information should be important for the selection of new donors; more studies are needed to fully map the risks in order to safeguard donors in the future."