Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
December 18, 2021
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Rates of HPV-related cervical cancer plummet after vaccine introduction

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
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Rates of HPV-associated cervical cancer decreased among women aged 15 to 39 years in the United States after the introduction of a vaccine, according to data reported in JAMA Pediatrics.

Tara Tabibi, BA, of the St. Louis University School of Medicine, and colleagues conducted a quasiexperimental analysis that compared the incidence and mortality rates of women with cervical cancer associated with HPV.

Source: Adobe Stock.
Source: Adobe Stock.

The study compared incidence and mortality rates among women from January 2001 through December 2015, with rates from January 2010 through December 2017. Vaccination against HPV was first recommended for females aged 11 to 26 years in 2006.

Tabibi and colleagues separated study participants into three groups by age — 15 to 24 years, 25 to 29 years and 30 to 39 years.

From 2001 to 2005, the incidence rates among the three age groups were 0.86, 6.08 and 13.6 per 100,000 cases, respectively. Mortality rates among the groups were 0.08, 0.57 and 1.95 per 100,000 cases, respectively.

From 2010 to 2017, the incidence rates among the three age groups were 0.54, 5.1 and 12.1 per 100,000 cases, respectively. Mortality rates among the groups were 0.04, 0.59 and 1.86 per 100,000 cases, respectively.

Incidence rates decreased among all three age groups, with the largest difference seen among those aged 15 to 24 years, who experienced a reduction of 37.7% (95% CI, 42.24% to 32.75%). There was a 16.16% reduction among participant aged 25 to 29 years, (95% CI, 19.45% to 12.69%) and an 8.03% reduction among those aged 30 to 39 years (95% CI, 9.9% to 6.12%).

“The current study adds to knowledge by quantitatively comparing changes in cervical cancer incidence by age-based vaccine eligibility and providing suggestive evidence for vaccine-associated decreases in cervical cancer mortality,” Tabibi wrote.