IDWeek

IDWeek

Source:

Levin MJ, et al. Abstract LB5. Present at: IDWeek; Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Levin reports ties to GlaxoSmithKline. Please see the abstract for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
October 04, 2021
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AstraZeneca’s mAb cocktail reduces risk for symptomatic COVID-19

Source:

Levin MJ, et al. Abstract LB5. Present at: IDWeek; Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Levin reports ties to GlaxoSmithKline. Please see the abstract for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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The PROVENT study demonstrated that AstraZeneca’s AZD7442 monoclonal antibody cocktail significantly reduced the risk for developing symptomatic COVID-19.

“We know from infectious diseases vaccinology in general that prevention is always better than treatment,” Myron J. Levin, MD, professor of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus, said during a presentation.

Levin MJ, et al. Abstract LB5. Present at: IDWeek; Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 2021 (virtual meeting).
Levin MJ, et al. Abstract LB5. Present at: IDWeek; Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 2021 (virtual meeting).

The PROVENT study investigated the efficacy and safety of AZD7442 — “a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies designed to be a pre-exposure prophylaxis for SARS-CoV-2 in adults,” Levin said. The phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolled 5,197 unvaccinated adults aged 18 years and older without prior SARS-CoV-2 infection who could benefit from immunoprophylaxis with antibodies because of an increased risk for severe illness or exposure. They were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive AZD7442 (n = 3,460) or placebo (n = 1,737).

Overall, the study demonstrated that AZD7442 reduced the risk for developing symptomatic COVID19 by 77% (95% CI, 46%-90%) compared with placebo (P < .001). Additionally, the percentages of participants who experienced adverse events were comparable: 35% of those who received AZD7441 and 34% of those who received placebo. Researchers added that only one case of severe COVID-19 and two deaths were documented during the study, all of which occurred in the placebo group.

Levin says these data show that AZD7442 is the first long-acting combination of monoclonal antibodies, and it represents a potential new option to prevent COVID-19.

“We need additional approaches for individuals who are not adequately protected by COVID-19 vaccines,” Mene Pangalos, executive vice president of biopharmaceuticals research and development at AstraZeneca, said in a press release. “We are very encouraged by these efficacy and safety data in high-risk people, showing our long-acting antibody combination has the potential to protect from symptomatic and severe disease, alongside vaccines.”

References:

Levin MJ, et al. Abstract LB5. Present at: IDWeek; Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Press release.