IDWeek

IDWeek

Perspective from Keith S. Kaye, MD, MPH
Source:

Cassino C, et al. Abstract LB12. Presented at: IDWeek; Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Cassino is employed by ContraFect Corporation. Please see the abstract for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
October 02, 2021
1 min read
Save

Single-dose lysin shows promise against S. aureus in phase 2 trial

Perspective from Keith S. Kaye, MD, MPH
Source:

Cassino C, et al. Abstract LB12. Presented at: IDWeek; Sept. 29-Oct. 3, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Cassino is employed by ContraFect Corporation. Please see the abstract for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Patients with Staphylococcus aureus who were treated with exebacase, a recombinantly produced lysin, achieved symptom resolution in half the time compared with participants who received placebo, researchers reported at IDWeek.

Cara Cassino, MD, chief medical officer and executive vice president of research and development at ContraFect Corporation — the biotechnology company that created exebacase — and colleagues conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multinational phase 2 study of 86 patients who were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either a single 2-hour infusion of exebacase or a placebo, in addition to standard-of-care antibiotics.

Source: Adobe Stock.
Source: Adobe Stock.

Symptoms resolved in 94.3% of participants who received exebacase and in 87.9% of those who received placebo, Cassino and colleagues reported. The median time for symptom resolution was 3 days for those who received exebacase and 6 days for those in the placebo arm.

Moreover, symptoms resolved in 3 days for those with MRSA who received exebacase compared with 7 days among those who received placebo. For participants with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, symptoms resolved in 3 days for those who received exebacase and in 5 days among those who received a placebo.

“We believe that these data suggest rapid bacteriolysis may translate into clinical benefit when lysin exebacase is used in addition to standard of care antibiotics,” Cassino said during her presentation.