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One Health Resource Center

Source:

CDC. Salmonella outbreaks linked to backyard poultry. https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/backyardpoultry-05-21/index.html. Accessed May 21, 2021.

May 21, 2021
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Health officials trace multiple Salmonella outbreaks to backyard poultry

Source:

CDC. Salmonella outbreaks linked to backyard poultry. https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/backyardpoultry-05-21/index.html. Accessed May 21, 2021.

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Health officials have traced a series of Salmonella outbreaks to backyard poultry.

To date, the outbreaks include 163 cases of Salmonella in 43 states, 34 of which resulted in hospitalization, according to the CDC. No deaths have been reported, and no recalls on poultry are currently active.

Backyard chicken
“Do not kiss or snuggle backyard poultry,” the CDC warned.
Source: Adobe Stock.

Backyard poultry like chickens or ducks can carry Salmonella, which can spread to humans if a person interacts with the animals and then touches their mouth or food.

To avoid contracting Salmonella, the CDC made the following recommendations:

  • Wash your hands or use hand sanitizer immediately after touching backyard poultry.
  • Do not kiss or snuggle backyard poultry or eat or drink around them.
  • Keep supplies used to take care of backyard poultry out of the house.
  • Supervise children around backyard poultry and do not let children aged younger than 5 years touch backyard poultry.
  • Collect eggs often and throw away cracked eggs.
  • Rub the dirt off of eggs and refrigerate eggs.
  • Cook eggs until both the yolk and white are firm, and cook all egg dishes to 160°F.

Additionally, the CDC said people handling backyard poultry should call their health care provider if they experience any of the following:

  • diarrhea and fever, with a temperature higher than 102°F;
  • diarrhea for 3 days or more that is not improving;
  • bloody diarrhea;
  • vomiting to a degree you cannot keep liquids down; and
  • signs of dehydration, including not urinating, dry mouth and throat and feeling dizzy when standing up.