NFID Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research
NFID Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research
Source/Disclosures
Source:

Laurens M, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of coadministration of meningococcal type A vaccine with typhoid conjugate vaccine in healthy children 15-23 months of age in Burkina Faso. Presented at: NFID Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research; June 18-19, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Laurens reports no relevant financial disclosures.
June 18, 2020
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Typhoid conjugate vaccine safe, effective when administered with meningococcal A

Source/Disclosures
Source:

Laurens M, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of coadministration of meningococcal type A vaccine with typhoid conjugate vaccine in healthy children 15-23 months of age in Burkina Faso. Presented at: NFID Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research; June 18-19, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Laurens reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Typhoid conjugate vaccine is safe and effective in children when given with meningococcal A vaccine as part of routine immunization.

Matthew B. Laurens

Findings were presented during the 2020 Virtual Annual Conference on Vaccinology Research sponsored by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases.

“WHO reviewed available data on typhoid conjugate vaccines and, in addition to recommending implementation of routine typhoid vaccination in endemic areas, recommended that studies are needed to assess coadministration of typhoid conjugate vaccines with routine immunizations,” Matthew B. Laurens, MD, MPH, associate professor of pediatrics and medicine and director of the pediatric infectious diseases fellowship and the International Clinical Trials Unit, Malaria Research Group, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, told Healio. “This is the first study to look at coadministration of typhoid conjugate vaccine with meningococcal A vaccine and the first vaccine trial of any typhoid conjugate vaccine in West Africa.”

Laurens and colleagues enrolled 150 children aged 15 to 23 months into three groups. Children (n = 49) in Group 1 received either Vi-based typhoid conjugate vaccine (Vi-TCV) and control vaccine (inactivated poliovaccine) with a subsequent capsular group A meningococcal conjugate (MCV-A) vaccine 28 days later, while children (n = 50) in Group 2 received Vi-TCV and MCV-A and children (n = 51) in Group 3 received MCV-A and control vaccine. The researchers evaluated reactions within 30 minutes of vaccination; solicited symptoms at 0, 3 and 7 days after vaccination; other adverse events within 28 days of vaccination; and serious adverse events within 6 months of vaccination.

According to Laurens, the typhoid conjugate vaccine was well tolerated by children and resulted in a robust immune response. It also did not interfere with the vaccine response to MCV-A, which is routinely given at 15 months of age in Burkina Faso.

Study data showed that solicited symptoms related to vaccination were similar for TCV and IPV, respectively, at day 0 and included fever or feverishness (2% vs. 5.9%) and injection site pain (0% vs. 1%); at day 3, which included fever or feverishness (2% vs. 3.9%) as well as irritability (0% vs. 2%) and injection site swelling (0% vs. 1%); and at day 7, which included fever or feverishness (2% vs. 0%) and irritability (2% vs. 0%). Postvaccination seroconversion for anti-Vi immunoglobulin G antibody was similar for patients given TCV with IPV vs. TCV with MCV-A (89.6% vs. 94%; P = 0.43). For patients who were administered MCV-A at enrollment, postvaccination MCV-A antibody geometric mean titer was similar for participants who received MCV-A with TCV vs. MCV-A with IPV (13,385 vs. 9,410), and a comparable percentage attained protective post-vaccination serum bacterial antibody titer greater than 128 (100% vs 98%).

“Typhoid conjugate vaccine can be safely and effectively administered with meningococcal A vaccine to children as part of routine immunization programs,” Laurens said. “This is especially important for policymakers and public health officials as they consider implementation of routine typhoid conjugate vaccination in their countries.”