International Liver Congress

International Liver Congress

Source:

Yip T, et al. Abstract OS-900. Presented at: the International Liver Congress; June 23-26 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Yip reports serving as an advisory board committee member and a speaker for Gilead Sciences.
July 07, 2021
1 min read
Save

Hepatitis B does not link to increased risk for liver injury, death in COVID-19

Source:

Yip T, et al. Abstract OS-900. Presented at: the International Liver Congress; June 23-26 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Yip reports serving as an advisory board committee member and a speaker for Gilead Sciences.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Chronic hepatitis B virus, whether current or past, was not associated with increased incidence of acute liver injury or death among patients with COVID-19, according to research presented at the International Liver Congress.

“There is emerging evidence that demonstrates the impact of HBV infection on COVID-19 patients. A recently published report described 105 COVID-19 patients, who also suffered from chronic HBV, showed elevated alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase occurred in 21% and 28% of the patients, respectively,” Terry Cheuk-Fung Yip, PhD, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, said. “However, the impact of HBV infection on COVID-19 remains unclear as non-chronic HBV patients were not included as control in the previous studies. Also, the impact of past exposure to HBV remains unknown.”

Risk for death among COVID-19 patients with comorbidities

In a retrospective study, researchers analyzed 5,693 patients with COVID-19 (mean age, 51 years; 49% men) from a territory-wide database to compare the incidence of liver injury and mortality among patients with a current HBV diagnosis (n = 353), a past HBV diagnosis (n = 359) or no HBV diagnosis (n = 4,927). After a median follow-up of 14 days, 2.4% of patients died and acute liver injury occurred in 1.2% of patients without HBV, 2.3% of patients with current HBV and 3.1% of patients with past HBV. Acute liver injury (adjusted HR = 2.45; 95% CI, 1.52-3.96) correlated with death while current HBV infection (aHR = 1.29; 95% CI, 0.61-2.7) and past HBV infection (aHR = 0.9; 95% CI, 0.56-1.46) did not. Similarly, corticosteroid, antifungal, ribavirin and lopinavir/ritonavir use (adjusted OR = 2.55-5.63) correlated with acute liver injury while current HBV infection (aOR = 1.93; 95% CI, 0.88-4.24) and past HBV infection (aOR = 1.25; 95% CI, 0.62-2.55) did not.

“Current or past HBV infection were not associated with death and acute liver injury,” Yip concluded. “The non-association remained robust after multivariable adjustment and propensity-score weighing.”