International Liver Congress

International Liver Congress

Source:

Kolligs F, et al. Abstract OS-777. Presented at: the International Liver Congress; June 23-26 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Kolligs reports serving on advisory boards/speakers bureaus for Bayer, Bristol Myers Squibb, Lilly, Exact Sciences, Exelixis, Falk Foundation, Ipsen and Roche. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
July 01, 2021
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TARE proves effective as first-line treatment for HCC

Source:

Kolligs F, et al. Abstract OS-777. Presented at: the International Liver Congress; June 23-26 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Kolligs reports serving on advisory boards/speakers bureaus for Bayer, Bristol Myers Squibb, Lilly, Exact Sciences, Exelixis, Falk Foundation, Ipsen and Roche. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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Transarterial radioembolization was a well-tolerated first-line treatment among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, according to research presented at the International Liver Congress.

“The CIRSE Registry for SIR-Spheres Therapy (CIRT) was the first medical society-sponsored study to address the need for large scale prospective data on the clinical application of transarterial radioembolization (TARE) in Europe,” Frank Kolligs, Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, said. “The endpoints of this study included the real life, clinical application of TARE with yttrium-90 (Y-90) resin microspheres in Europe, effectiveness ... safety and quality of life data.”

In a prospective, multicenter, observational study, researchers analyzed 422 patients with HCC (median age, 68 years; 80.8% men) treated with TARE with Y-90 resin microspheres for primary and metastatic malignant liver tumors. Investigators recorded baseline characteristics and treatment-related data as well as overall survival, progression-free survival, hepatic progression-free survival and safety data every 3 months for 24 months; the rate of loss to follow-up was 28%.

According to study results, 50.2% of patients received TARE as a first-line treatment and 44.8% of patients received TARE following locoregional treatments, 10.7% of patients received prior systemic treatment. Treatment intention was primarily palliative (57.3%) or tumor downsizing (32.5%). Median OS was 16.5 months (95% CI, 14.2–19.3), median PFS was 6.1 months (95% CI, 5.7–7) and median hepatic PFS was 6.7 months (95% CI 5.9–7.6). Researchers noted 36.7% of patients experienced at least one adverse event and 7.1% of patients experienced at least one serious adverse event. The 30-day mortality rate was 0.7%.

“This exploratory study evaluated factors that can influence the application and outcome of TARE in clinical practice. TARE is generally applied according to guideline recommendations,” Kolligs concluded. “Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the effect of personalized dosimetry on the effectiveness of TARE.”