The Liver Meeting
The Liver Meeting
Source/Disclosures
Source:

Jang H, et al. Abstract 159. Presented at: The Liver Meeting Digital Experience; Nov. 13-16, 2020.

Disclosures: Jang reports no relevant financial disclosures.
November 17, 2020
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Aspirin reduces risk for HCC in chronic hepatitis B

Source/Disclosures
Source:

Jang H, et al. Abstract 159. Presented at: The Liver Meeting Digital Experience; Nov. 13-16, 2020.

Disclosures: Jang reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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For patients with chronic hepatitis B, aspirin therapy correlated with a reduced risk for hepatocellular carcinoma, according to a presenter at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience.

“Cirrhosis had a significant effect on the association between use of aspirin and the risk of HCC development,” Heejoon Jang, MD, from the department of internal medicine and Liver Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, said during his presentation.

Aspirin

For patients with chronic hepatitis B, aspirin therapy correlated with a reduced risk for hepatocellular carcinoma.

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Using the Korean National Health insurance database, Jang and colleagues identified 329,635 adult patients with chronic hepatitis B; 20,200 of whom received aspirin for 90 or more consecutive days and 309,435 who never received antiplatelet therapy. To balance baseline characteristics between aspirin users and nonusers, investigators developed a propensity score-matched cohort. Researchers then estimated risk for HCC development.

Propensity score matching analysis generated 19,003 pairs. Median follow-up was 6.7 years.

Results showed the cumulative HCC incidence among patients who received aspirin was lower compared with nonusers of aspirin (P < .0001). Investigators also saw a correlation between aspirin use and lower risk for HCC (adjusted HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.78–0.92). Data showed a lower cumulative incidence of HCC in aspirin users without cirrhosis (16,507 pairs; aHR = 0.87 for HCC; 95% CI, 0.79–0.95).

“However, in patients with cirrhosis, there was no significant difference in the risk of HCC development between the aspirin treated group and the nontreated group,” Jang said.

Moreover, the correlation between aspirin therapy and HCC was not clearly evident (aHR = 1; 95% CI, 0.85–1.18).