Take Homes in Lung Cancer

Take Homes in Lung Cancer

Source:

Garon EB, et al. LBA49. Presented at: ESMO 2021 (virtual meeting); Sept. 16-22, 2021.

Disclosures: Jänne reports consulting for AstraZeneca and Daiichi and that his institution received sponsored research support from AstraZeneca and Daiichi.
October 15, 2021
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VIDEO: Antibody-drug conjugate ‘encouraging’ in lung cancer subsets

Source:

Garon EB, et al. LBA49. Presented at: ESMO 2021 (virtual meeting); Sept. 16-22, 2021.

Disclosures: Jänne reports consulting for AstraZeneca and Daiichi and that his institution received sponsored research support from AstraZeneca and Daiichi.
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In an interview with Healio, Pasi A. Jänne, MD, PhD, discussed a study on the use of an antibody-drug conjugate in some patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

Jänne, director of the Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, explained that phase 1 trial results presented at the meeting from a study assessing the TROP2 antibody-drug conjugate DS-1062a (datopotamab deruxtecan) found that there was some response to treatment among patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC who had actionable genomic alterations.

He noted that these findings were “encouraging,” as the treatment may offer additional options for patients who do not respond to genotype-directed therapies.

“I felt this was interesting because I think it opens up a new therapeutic approach that we hadn’t previously had,” Jänne said.

Studies are underway to evaluate the use of this antibody drug conjugate in lung cancer, according to Jänne.

“I look forward to additional data that will emerge from these studies,” he said.