Discoveries in Multiple Myeloma

Discoveries in Multiple Myeloma

Source:

Hevroni G, et al. Abstract 8040. Presented at: ASCO Annual Meeting; June 4-8, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Hevroni reports no relevant financial disclosures.
August 11, 2021
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Wearable sleep monitors may give insight into HRQoL in multiple myeloma

Source:

Hevroni G, et al. Abstract 8040. Presented at: ASCO Annual Meeting; June 4-8, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Hevroni reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Mobile wearables that monitor sleep may give insight into health-related quality of life in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, according to a presentation from the virtual ASCO Annual Meeting.

With more people living longer with multiple myeloma due to recent advances in therapy, new approaches may be needed to address treatment side effects, like insomnia, according to Gil Hevroni, MD, internal medicine resident at SUNY Downstate Medical Center.

“Current practices rely on electronic patient-related outcomes, otherwise known as ePROs, via questionnaires to measure health care-related quality of life and, although useful, they can be very subjective and cumbersome to analyze and therefore, some patient struggles may be overlooked,” Hevroni said. “Mobile wearables, like FitBits, allow us to track activities including sleep, providing us with objective data. This may be useful in enhancing healthcare-related quality of life in cancer patients who are currently undergoing treatment.”

In a prospective study, researchers remotely monitored sleep patterns on 40 newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients to establish sleep bioprofiles during therapy and correlate with ePRO surveys.

Patients with untreated multiple myeloma were assigned to either cohort A if they were younger than 65 years or cohort B if they were older than 65 years. They were remotely monitored for sleep 1 to 7 days at baseline and continuously up to six therapy cycles and completed ePRO questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 and MY20) at baseline and after each cycle. Via Sensorlink technology, sleep data and completed ePRO surveys were synced to Medidata Rave and researchers estimated links between sleep measurement trends and QLQ-C30 scores using a linear mixed model with a random intercept.

Hevroni and colleagues compiled sleep data from 23 patients. Regimens included carfilzomib, lenalidomide and dexamethasone (KRd); lenalidomide, bortezomib and dexamethasone (RVd); daratumumab-KRd; bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone (VCd); and lenalidomide plus dexamethasone (Rd).

On average, sleep was longer in cohort A than cohort B at baseline (578.9 min/24 hours vs. 544.9 min/24 hours). Median sleep trends changed for cohort A by –6.3 min/24 hour per cycle and for cohort B by +0.8 min/24 hours per cycle.

There was no link observed between sleep measurements and ePRO. Researchers reported a difference in sleep on dexamethasone days compared with all other days during the sample cycle period for cohort A (81.4 min/24 hours; 95% CI, 26-135) and for cohort B (37.4 min/24 hours; 95% CI, 41-115).

“Due to its restrictive burden of symptoms and chronic nature, multiple myeloma is a malignant disease where assessing health care-related quality of life outcomes should be a primary focus of active research,” Hevroni said. “Sleep is an integral part of well-being in the cancer patient, and future studies should continue to characterize sleep patterns as they relate to quality of life.

“Mobile wearables allow us to collect objective sleep data and that may be an essential part in enhancing existing ePRO tools currently being used as the standard for measuring health care-related quality of life in cancer patients,” she concluded.