HemOnc Today's PharmAnalysis

HemOnc Today's PharmAnalysis

Disclosures: CDC supported the study. Trogdon reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
July 28, 2021
2 min read
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Costs of metastatic breast cancer could jump 140% by 2030

Disclosures: CDC supported the study. Trogdon reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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Total annual costs associated with metastatic breast cancer in the U.S. could exceed $152 billion in 2030, according to a study published in JNCI Cancer Spectrum.

Researchers attributed the estimated increase to a rise in cases among younger women.

Total annual costs associated with metastatic breast cancer in the U.S. could exceed $152 billion in 2030.
Data derived from Gogate A, et al. JNCI Cancer Spectrum. 2021;doi:10.1093/jncics/pkab063.

“My colleagues at the CDC and I had been investigating the economic burden of breast cancer for younger women. CDC was interested in focusing on younger women with metastatic breast cancer, given the growth in this population and the high disease burden for these women,” Justin Trogdon, PhD, research fellow at the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and professor of health policy and management at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, told Healio. “This is one of the first studies to look at trends in prevalence and cost of metastatic breast cancer by age group.”

Photo of Justin G. Trogdon 2018
Justin Trogdon

Trogdon and colleagues developed a stock/flow model of women entering the metastatic breast cancer population at initial diagnosis or through progression of earlier-stage cancer and exiting through death.

Researchers estimated the number of metastatic breast cancer cases and costs attributable to metastatic breast cancer from 2015 through 2030 among three different age groups — younger (aged 18 to 44 years), midlife (aged 45 to 64 years) and older (aged 65 years and older). They used U.S. Census projections and data from the SEER registry and peer-reviewed literature for input parameters by age and phase of treatment.

Results showed an estimated increase in metastatic breast cancer cases of 54.8%, from 158,997 in 2015 to 246,194 in 2030. Estimated medical and productivity costs of metastatic breast cancer in 2015 across all age groups and phases of care totaled $63.4 billion (95% sensitivity range, 59.4 billion to 67.4 billion), which researchers estimated would jump by 140% to $152.4 billion in 2030.

Estimated total costs in 2030 were highest for women aged 45 to 64 years ($75.3 billion) followed by women aged 18 to 44 years ($42.4 billion) and women aged 65 years and older ($34.7 billion).

“Our results suggest that the cost of metastatic breast cancer could increase substantially in the coming decade, especially among younger and midlife women,” Trogdon said. “We have one more analysis forthcoming that investigates the cost effectiveness of different treatment options for metastatic breast cancer.”

For more information:

Justin Trogdon, PhD, can be reached at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 250 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill, NC 27514; email: justintrogdon@unc.edu.