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Press Release

July 24, 2021
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NCI branch chief receives award for BRCA-related research

Source:

Press Release

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Andre Nussenzweig, PhD, received the ninth annual Basser Global Prize.

The award, presented by Basser Center for BRCA at Abramson Cancer Center at University of Pennsylvania, recognizes a scientist who has advanced BRCA1/BRCA2-related research. The award provides $100,000 in research support, a sculpture and a $10,000 personal prize.

Andre Nussenzweig, PhD
Andre Nussenzweig

Nussenzweig is branch chief of the Laboratory of Genome Integrity in NCI’s Center for Cancer Research. His work related to DNA repair, replication and genome integrity in cells led to discoveries that have had an impact on development of biomarkers and targeted therapeutics for treatment of BRCA-related cancers.

“It’s an honor to bestow this award to an esteemed researcher from the NCI who has uncovered key insights into understanding the causes of BRCA-mutated cancers and mechanisms driving treatment resistance,” Susan M. Domchek, MD, executive director of Basser Center for BRCA, said in a press release. “It’s these types of basic science discoveries that will move us closer to improved therapies for patients.”

Nussenzweig served as a research fellow at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center before joining NIH’s Experimental Immunology Branch in 1998. He established the Laboratory of Genome Integrity at NCI.

He will give the keynote address at the 10th annual Basser Center for BRCA Scientific Symposium, scheduled for May 10-11, 2022.

“I am extremely honored to receive this recognition from the Basser Center, which has contributed so much support for BRCA-related research and improved the clinical care of patients who bear [BRCA1/BRCA2] mutations,” Nussenzweig said in the release.