ASCO Annual Meeting

ASCO Annual Meeting

Perspective from Lu Wang, MD, PhD
Source:

Church AJ, et al. Abstract 10005. Presented at: Presented at: ASCO Annual Meeting (virtual meeting); June 4-8, 2021.

Disclosures: Church reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the abstract for all other researchers’ relevant financial disclosures.
June 07, 2021
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Molecular tumor profiling beneficial in pediatric solid cancers

Perspective from Lu Wang, MD, PhD
Source:

Church AJ, et al. Abstract 10005. Presented at: Presented at: ASCO Annual Meeting (virtual meeting); June 4-8, 2021.

Disclosures: Church reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the abstract for all other researchers’ relevant financial disclosures.
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Molecular profiling of solid tumors in children and young adults has a significant impact on diagnosis and treatment recommendations, according to results of an interim analysis presented during the virtual ASCO Annual Meeting.

“Molecular tumor profiling has made significant strides during the past decade and is now standard of care for many adult solid tumors. Although we are learning more each day about the pediatric cancer genome and targeted therapies, the significance of molecular tumor profiling for children with cancer is not well-understood,” Alanna J. Church, MD, associate director of the Laboratory for Molecular Pediatric Pathology and staff pathologist in the department of pathology at Boston Children’s Hospital, said during her presentation.

Molecular profiling of solid tumors in children and young adults has a significant impact on diagnosis and treatment recommendations.
Data were derived from Church AJ, et al. Abstract 10005. Presented at: Presented at: ASCO Annual Meeting (virtual meeting); June 4-8, 2021.

The prospective cohort GAIN/iCat2 consortium study evaluated the use of genomic profiling of solid tumors among 345 children and young adults (mean age at diagnosis, 11 years; 56% male; 71% white) with high-risk refractory or relapsed solid non-brain tumors (65% sarcoma) receiving treatment across 12 U.S. pediatric cancer centers.

Alanna J. Church, MD
Alanna J. Church

Researchers performed targeted DNA next-generation sequencing on one or more tumor samples from each patient, with some samples subjected to RNA sequencing. They then used established guidelines to classify all identified genomic alterations according to impact on diagnosis, prognosis or response to targeted therapy matched to an identified alteration.

The study’s primary aim was to describe OS according to whether patients received matched targeted therapy identified by tumor profiling. Secondary and exploratory objectives included description of the frequency and range of molecular alterations and in-depth evaluation of extraordinary response to matched targeted therapy.

Results of the interim analysis showed 87% of patients had at least one genomic alteration of clinical significance. Among them, 60% had genomic alterations of diagnostic significance, 15% had alterations of prognostic significance and 70% had alterations of therapeutic significance; 11% of the latter group had Tier 1 molecular findings. Researchers noted that 78% of alterations deemed diagnostically significant were fusions.

In addition, 31 (15%) of the 205 patients deemed eligible to receive matched targeted therapy received such therapy. Among them, six had extraordinary responses to treatment, and all these responders had treatment matched to a gene fusion.

“These results emphasize the importance of fusion detection for patients with sarcomas and rare tumors,” Church said.