Immuno-Oncology Resource Center

Immuno-Oncology Resource Center

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Press Release

March 11, 2021
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Oncologist joins Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy as senior VP

Source:

Press Release

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Ute Dugan, MD, PhD, has been appointed senior vice president for clinical research at Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

She will oversee the institute’s clinical development, regulatory affairs and translational medicine efforts, with an emphasis on advancing novel breakthrough treatment combinations and overcoming immunotherapy resistance.

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“Dr. Dugan has been an incredible collaborator and champion of [Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy’s] mission over the last several years, and we’re excited to welcome her to our team,” Sean Parker, the institute’s founder and chairman, said in a press release. “In addition to her work as a world-class cancer researcher, she also brings a passionate focus on the patient perspective, making sure that we always remember who we’re working for as we pioneer the next breakthroughs in immunotherapy.”

Dugan most recently served as head of worldwide oncology external medical affairs at Bristol Myers Squibb. She previously held positions with Roche/Genentech and Aventis, and she also served as associate professor for medical oncology and senior physician at University Clinic of West German Cancer and Transplant Center in Germany.

“[Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy] is bringing together the brightest academic and scientific minds with the goal to create significant therapeutic advances for [patients with cancer],” Dugan said in the release. “[The institute] is uniquely positioned to integrate and leverage the best experts in the field to help solve some of cancer’s most intractable problems.”