Take Homes in Ovarian Cancer
Take Homes in Ovarian Cancer
Source/Disclosures
Source:

du Bois A, et al. Abstract 6000. Presented at: ASCO20 Virtual Scientific Program; May 29-31, 2020.
Zang R, et al. Abstract 6001. Presented at: ASCO20 Virtual Scientific Program; May 29-31, 2020.

July 07, 2020
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Patient survival greatly impacted by selection for ovarian cancer relapse surgery

Source/Disclosures
Source:

du Bois A, et al. Abstract 6000. Presented at: ASCO20 Virtual Scientific Program; May 29-31, 2020.
Zang R, et al. Abstract 6001. Presented at: ASCO20 Virtual Scientific Program; May 29-31, 2020.

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Studies presented during the ASCO2020 Virtual Scientific Program showed the benefit of validated selection tools in pursuing surgical measures for ovarian cancer relapse, Ursula A. Matulonis, MD, of Dana Farber Cancer Institute, told Healio.

Matulonis detailed Desktop 3, which sought to show the benefit of a predictive score to identify patients who had a complete response in surgery and might benefit from another surgery at the time of relapse, specifically platinum-sensitive relapse. Additionally, she said SOC 1 looked at similar outcomes.

“The whole purpose of this study was to look at survival,” she said. “Surgery offers selected patients – per Desktop 3 as well as SOC 1 – an overall survival advantage but it’s really important to make sure validated tools are employed for patient selection.”

Additionally, Matulonis explained that surgeon input on the likelihood of full resection is a crucial component.

“The best results happened with R0 surgery. Patients go to surgery at the time of platinum sensitive relapse and they cannot undergo a complete resection, ... they actually do worse than patients who are randomized to no surgery,” she said. “That’s certainly interesting and we need to take note of that. Hence, it’s very important that patients are selected where the surgeon thinks that he or she can get to no evidence of disease because if they don’t, there’s a possibility those patients are going to fare worse than if they never underwent surgery in the first place.”