Take Homes in Infection

Take Homes in Infection

Source: Healio Interview
Disclosures: Allegretti reports consulting for Artugen, Bacainn, Bristol Myers Squibb, Janssen, Morphic, Pandion, Pfizer, Servatus and Takeda, and serving on an advisory board for Finch Therapeutics, Iterative Scopes, Merck and OpenBiome.
December 17, 2021
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VIDEO: SER-109 may represent ‘paradigm shift’ in management of recurrent C. difficile

Source: Healio Interview
Disclosures: Allegretti reports consulting for Artugen, Bacainn, Bristol Myers Squibb, Janssen, Morphic, Pandion, Pfizer, Servatus and Takeda, and serving on an advisory board for Finch Therapeutics, Iterative Scopes, Merck and OpenBiome.
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Jessica R. Allegretti, MD, MPH, spoke with Healio about a study demonstrating the efficacy of SER-109 in preventing recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection, including in patients using acid-suppressing medications.

The data, presented at the ACG Annual Meeting, showed that SER-109 (Seres Therapeutics), an oral investigational microbiome therapeutic, reduced recurrent C. difficile infection across a broad range of risk factors.

“SER-109 may represent a potential paradigm shift in clinical management of patients with recurrent C. difficile because we’re seeing some of these more specified microbiome therapeutics as opposed to a very broad-spectrum, traditional fecal microbiota transplantation, which is what I think the authors were trying to point out,” Allegretti, director of the fecal microbiota center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, said.

One of the big focuses of the presentation, Allegretti noted, was that patients who received SER-109 vs. placebo, regardless of their use of proton pump inhibitors or acid-suppressing medications, fared extremely well.

“Even with the addition of that known risk factor, this therapy still seemed to work, so this can certainly help clinical decision making in the future,” Allegretti said.

Reference

Korman L, et al. Investigational microbiome therapeutic SER-109 reduces the risk of recurrent Clostridioides difficile Infection (rCDI) compared to placebo in patients with risk factors for recurrence, including acid-reducing medications. Presented at: ACG Annual Scientific Meeting; Oct. 22-27, 2021; Las Vegas (hybrid meeting).