Take Homes in Infection

Take Homes in Infection

Source:

Allegretti JR, et al. CP101, an investigational orally administered microbiome therapeutic, increases intestinal microbiome diversity and prevents recurrent C. difficile infection: Results from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Presented at: ACG Annual Scientific Meeting; Oct. 22-27, 2021; Las Vegas (hybrid meeting).

Disclosures: Foster reports no relevant financial disclosures.
November 24, 2021
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VIDEO: ‘Excellent data’ on investigational microbiome therapy for recurrent C. difficile

Source:

Allegretti JR, et al. CP101, an investigational orally administered microbiome therapeutic, increases intestinal microbiome diversity and prevents recurrent C. difficile infection: Results from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Presented at: ACG Annual Scientific Meeting; Oct. 22-27, 2021; Las Vegas (hybrid meeting).

Disclosures: Foster reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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In this video, C. Jonathan D. Foster, DO, FACOI, discusses results from the PRISM3 trial assessing CP101, an investigational microbiome therapeutic, for recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection.

The randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled PRISM3 trial, which was presented at the ACG Annual Scientific Meeting, showed that CP101 met its primary endpoint of sustained clinical cure, defined as an absence of C. difficile recurrence, at 8 weeks, with no serious treatment-related adverse events.

Foster, medical director of gastroenterology and advanced endoscopy at Jefferson Health New Jersey, noted that these are “excellent data for the future,” adding that this treatment is particularly relevant during the COVID-19 era.

“With the issue of COVID-19 and decreased availability of fecal transplant, we need to have an FDA-approved oral medication to help prevent recurrence of C. difficile infection other than the antibiotics that are currently out there,” Foster said. “We look forward to the phase 3 clinical trial and the future of this medication and hope that it will one day be approved for usage in the United States and Europe.”