Take Homes in Infection

Take Homes in Infection

Source:

Healio Interview

Disclosures: Feuerstadt reports being an advisory committee/board member/consultant for Ferring Pharmaceuticals/Rebiotix; on the speakers bureau for Merck; and advisory committee/board member for Seres Therapeutics.
November 12, 2021
1 min watch
Save

VIDEO: C. difficile incidence rate not lower with COVID-19 precautions

Source:

Healio Interview

Disclosures: Feuerstadt reports being an advisory committee/board member/consultant for Ferring Pharmaceuticals/Rebiotix; on the speakers bureau for Merck; and advisory committee/board member for Seres Therapeutics.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

In this video, Paul Feuerstadt, MD, FACG, AGAF, discussed the annual incidence rate of Clostridioides difficile infection during and in the years preceding the COVID-19 pandemic.

In 2011, health care-associated infections, as compared with community-associated infections, accounted for two-thirds of C. difficile infections, Feuerstadt, assistant clinical professor of medicine at Yale University, said. By contrast, in 2017, the incidence rate was split between health care-associated and community-associated infections, with the incidence of health care-associated infections decreasing while the incidence of community-associated infections remaining the same. This was primarily due to better infection control, Feuerstadt noted.

“The logical extension would be with even better infection control, we might be able to drive down the rates of C. difficile infection,” Feuerstadt said.

When comparing the rates of C. difficile testing and positive results during February to May 2019 and the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic from February to May 2020, the rates were the same, according to Feuerstadt.

“Even though we were even more careful with our infection control having not known how COVID-19 was transmitted and trying to block any transmission within the health care system, and the patients with COVID-19 were getting the kitchen sink thrown at them with antimicrobials and steroids and all these other things, the incidence of C. difficile didn’t change.”