Disclosures: This study was supported by grants from the Einar and Inga Nilsson Foundation, Lundgren Foundation and Skåne University Hospital Foundation. The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
September 03, 2021
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Heparin-binding protein levels dramatically increase in acute pancreatitis

Disclosures: This study was supported by grants from the Einar and Inga Nilsson Foundation, Lundgren Foundation and Skåne University Hospital Foundation. The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
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Patients with acute pancreatitis had significantly increased levels of heparin that were far greater than previously reported in other conditions, according to a study published in BMC Gastroenterology.

“Further research should aim to investigate the role of [heparin-binding protein] in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis and whether [heparin-binding protein] can be used as a biomarker for the early detection of specific complications in patients with moderately severe and severe disease,” Martina Sjöbeck, from the department of surgery, clinical sciences, Malmö, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, in Sweden, and colleagues wrote.

Sjöbeck and colleagues enrolled 260 patients with acute pancreatitis who were admitted to the Skåne University Hospital in Malmö between 2010 and 2013. Measured levels of heparin-binding protein upon hospital admission in 204 patients with confirmed acute pancreatitis served as the primary outcome. Secondary endpoints included associations between heparin-binding protein concentrations, disease severity and fluid balance. Researchers used Pearson correlation to analyze the association between heparin-binding protein levels and fluid balance. They also used a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to evaluate the ability of heparin-binding protein to predict moderately severe/severe acute pancreatitis.

Investigators found the overall median heparin-binding protein level was 529 ng/mL. Heparin-binding protein levels based on acute pancreatitis severity were not significantly different between the groups.

“In mild pancreatitis, the median [heparin-binding protein] level was 527 (301–887) ng/mL; in moderately severe cases, it was 529 (338–955) ng/mL; and in the severe group, the median heparin-binding protein was 640 (383–1465) ng/mL (P= .474),” the investigators wrote.

Sjöbeck and colleagues noted the fluid balance between patients with mild compared with moderately severe and severe pancreatitis was significantly different after day 2 ( 83 vs. 510 vs. 2,260 mL). However, there was no association between heparin-binding protein concentration and fluid balance.