Digestive Disease Week

Digestive Disease Week

Perspective from Stephen B. Hanauer, MD
Source:

Lo C, et al. Abstract 389. Presented at: Digestive Disease Week; May 21-23, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Lo reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
May 23, 2021
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Higher consumption of ultra-processed foods increases risk for Crohn’s

Perspective from Stephen B. Hanauer, MD
Source:

Lo C, et al. Abstract 389. Presented at: Digestive Disease Week; May 21-23, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Lo reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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Rising rates of ultra-processed food consumption correlated with an increased risk for Crohn’s disease, according to a presentation at Digestive Disease Week.

“The pathophysiology of IBD is related to an inappropriate host-immune response to commensal bacteria in genetically susceptible individuals. Environmental factors, especially diet, play an important role on the development of IBD,” Chun-Han Lo, MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital, said. “Compared with the Mediterranean diet, the Western diet is widely thought to increase the risk of IBD, potentially through changes in the gut microbiome and epithelial barrier function and seem to have direct influence on immune function.”

Foods high in fats
Source: Adobe Stock

To evaluate the association between UPF consumption and the risk for CD and ulcerative colitis, researchers analyzed 241,252 patients from the Nurses’ Health Study and the Nurses’ Health Study II. They used validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires to assess dietary intake and medical records to confirm diagnoses.

According to study results, there were 368 incident cases of CD and 488 incident cases of UC; the median age at diagnosis was 56 years. Participants in the highest quartile of UPF consumption and emulsifier/thickener-rich food intake had an increased risk for CD compared with participants in the lowest quartile (HR = 1.72; 95% CI, 1.24-2.38; HR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.03-1.88, respectively). Researchers noted no association between consumption of UPFs and emulsifier and risk for UC.

“A higher consumption of UPS products especially ultra-processed grain foods, fat, sauces and emulsifier/thickener-containing foods was associated with increased risk of CD,” Lo concluded. “Further studies on the factor of ultra-processed food intake in patients with established diseases may be warranted.”