Digestive Disease Week

Digestive Disease Week

Perspective from Stephen B. Hanauer, MD
Source:

Siddiqui M, et al. Abstract 254. Presented at: Digestive Disease Week; May 21-23, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Siddiqui reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors relevant financial disclosures.
May 23, 2021
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Alcohol use disorder links to higher mortality in IBD

Perspective from Stephen B. Hanauer, MD
Source:

Siddiqui M, et al. Abstract 254. Presented at: Digestive Disease Week; May 21-23, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Siddiqui reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors relevant financial disclosures.
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Alcohol use disorder correlated with a higher risk for in-hospital mortality among patients with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a presentation at Digestive Disease Week.

“It is reported that 54% of patients with Crohn's disease and 61% of patients with ulcerative colitis identify themselves as active drinkers. Among these IBD patients who are actively drinking, approximately half of them report moderate, heavy or binge drinking,” Mohamed Tausif Siddiqui, MD, Cleveland Clinic, and colleagues wrote. “Despite this, there is very limited literature studying the outcomes of alcohol use in patients with IBD and the large hospitalization record databases have never been explored to study this association.”

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In a retrospective study, researchers used the Nationwide In-patient Sample database to identify adult patients diagnosed with IBD and hospitalized for alcohol use disorder (AUD). They further analyzed the differences in mortality, length of stay and associated cost as well as how hospitalizations associated with age, sex and race.

Of 641,525 hospitalizations (62.4% CD), 3.43% resulted from an AUD diagnosis; patients with IBD and AUD had higher all-cause in-hospital rates of mortality (17 per 1,000 hospitalizations; OR = 1.14; 95% CI, 1.03-1.06; adjusted OR = 1.18; 95% CI, 1.04-1.31) compared with patients without AUD (14 per 1,000 hospitalizations). Middle age (51 years-65 years: aOR = 3.4), male sex (aOR = 2.6) and Caucasian and Native American race (aOR = 1.2; aOR = 2.2) corelated with a higher risk for AUD. Researchers noted no significant differences between the two groups for length of stay, hospital cost, CD diagnosis or UC diagnosis.

“We found that there is a low, but considerable, proportion of IBD patients with AUD,” Siddiqui concluded. “The concurrent diagnosis of AUD is associated with a higher risk of mortality. Due to this higher risk, the screening of IBD patients for alcohol use should be advised and patients should be counseled accordingly.”