Digestive Disease Week

Digestive Disease Week

Source:

Vangimalla S, et al. Abstract 104. Presented at: Digestive Disease Week; May 21-23, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Vangimalla reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
May 22, 2021
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Major depressive disorder links to increased burden among patients with IBD

Source:

Vangimalla S, et al. Abstract 104. Presented at: Digestive Disease Week; May 21-23, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Vangimalla reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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Patients with major depressive disorder and inflammatory bowel disease had increased morbidity and discharge rates to non-home settings as well as increased heathcare burden, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week.

“Novel research previously hypothesizes bidirectional pathways between depression and IBD where poor disease management can drive depression and depression, in turn, can precede the onset of IBD or clinical recurrence,” Shiva Shankar Vangimalla, MBBS, internal medicine at MedStar Washington Hospital Center, said. “Over the last few years, there have been many large population-based studies in Canada and European countries that estimated significantly higher prevalence of depression in IBD patients and also its association with poor clinical outcomes; however, no such data or literature exists in the U.S. population.”

Depression
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Using the National Inpatient Sample database, researchers identified 72,875 patients hospitalized with Crohn’s disease related to major depressive disorder (MDD) and 35,665 patients hospitalized with ulcerative colitis related to MDD. Compared with patients without MDD, the presence of MDD correlated with a higher length of stay in patients with CD (5.6 days vs. 5 days) and in patients with UC (6 days vs 5.5 days). It also correlated with an increase rate of severe loss of function (OR = 1.27; 95% CI, 1.25-1.3; OR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.27-1.34, respectively) and discharge to non-home settings (OR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.29-1.34; OR = 1.43; 95% CI, 1.39-1.47). Researchers further noted lower inpatient mortality rates in patients with MDD (OR = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.51-0.61; OR = 0.8; 95% CI, 0.73-0.87) when compared with patients without MDD.

“Our study showed that there is a significant burden of MDD in IBD patients, especially, more so in CD than in UC. Older age, female [sex], lower income and white race were the major epidemiological characteristics of IBD patients with concurrent depression,” Vangimalla concluded. “Increased morbidity and discharges to non-home settings suggests an increased overall healthcare burden by these patients with depression.”