Disclosures: Tsang reports being an employee of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; however, completed all work correlated with this manuscript while employed at the National Cancer Institute. The other authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
March 05, 2021
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H. pylori infection high among Hispanic/Latino individuals

Disclosures: Tsang reports being an employee of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.; however, completed all work correlated with this manuscript while employed at the National Cancer Institute. The other authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
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Researchers observed high helicobacter pylori infection seroprevalence among Hispanic/Latino individuals, which varied by nativity and background, according to study results.

“Our findings demonstrated a high burden of H. pylori infection in all Hispanics/Latinos and identify specific vulnerable groups by self-reported background and sociodemographic/clinical characteristics,” Sabrina H. Tsang, PhD, MPH, from the division of cancer epidemiology and genetics at the National Cancer Institute in Maryland, and colleagues wrote. “This study highlights the lack of progress and the importance of this bacterial infection in the U.S. and suggests opportunities for prevention measures in the Hispanic/Latino population.”

In the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, Tsang and colleagues recruited 16,144 self-identified Hispanic or Latino people from randomly selected households. Investigators used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using plasma samples to measure anti-H pylori immunoglobulin G antibodies and multivariable logistic regression models to calculate seroprevalence.

The overall weighted H. pylori seroprevalence among the participants was 57%, with 36% seropositivity among U.S. born participants and 62% among non-U.S. born participants.

“Age-adjusted prevalence varied by self-reported Hispanic/Latino background, ranging from 47% in Puerto Rican to 72% in Central American backgrounds,” Tsang and colleagues wrote. Individuals with older age, male sex, lower education, non-U.S. born status, smoking, greater number of missing teeth, fewer doctor visits, lower ferritin level, and hepatitis A seropositivity had higher adjusted H. pylori seroprevalence.