Ulcerative Colitis Resource Center

Ulcerative Colitis Resource Center

Source:

Jagannath B, et al. Wearable Sweat Sensing Device for Detection of IBD Biomarkers. Presented at: Crohn’s and Colitis Congress (virtual); Feb. 21-24, 2021.

Disclosures: Jagannath reports no relevant financial disclosures.
January 23, 2021
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Wearable sweat sensing device may lead to better treatment of IBD

Source:

Jagannath B, et al. Wearable Sweat Sensing Device for Detection of IBD Biomarkers. Presented at: Crohn’s and Colitis Congress (virtual); Feb. 21-24, 2021.

Disclosures: Jagannath reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Researchers developed a wearable sweat senser device that may improve treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, according to a presenter at the virtual Crohn’s and Colitis Congress.

“CLASP demonstrated on-body continuous monitoring in 20 human subjects with stable response for at least 4 days,” Badrinath Jagannath, MD, from The University of Texas, Dallas, said during his presentation. “[It] established presence of calprotectin in sweat.”

CLASP is a wearable sweat senser developed by Jagannath and colleagues with functionalization of specific affinity capture probes on metal/semiconducting interface deposited on a porous patch substrate. Investigators detected interaction between specific antibody and target analyte with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

“In this work we are looking at four inflammatory biomarkers, interleukin 1 beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha and C-reactive proteins,” he said. “Recently we have started investigating calprotectin,” he said. “This was the first project where we discovered there is CRP and calprotectin in sweat.”

Investigators tested the sweat senser on 20 patients with IBD. To report IL-1 beta and CRP levels in sweat in real-time, they recorded continuous on-body measurements.

Results showed a limit of detection of 1 pg/mL with a dynamic range from 1 pg/mL to 512 pg/mL for both the biomarkers in sweat. The sensor showed excellent correlation with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method.

According to Jagannath, there was a mean concentration of 28 pg/mL for IL-1 beta in a healthy cohort with on-body monitoring using sweat senser from passively perspired sweat.

Jagannath reported his group is collaborating on a study with a group from the University of Chicago.

“[We] ae currently testing on 20 IBD patients where we will be testing the blood serum levels, the inflammatory markers through the sweat sensor, to look at the correlations and see if we can actually differentiate the inflammation markers between IBD patients and a healthy cohort,” Jagannath said.