American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting

American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting

Source:

Raed A. P0399. Presented at: The American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting (Virtual). Oct. 26-28, 2020.

Disclosures: Raed reports no relevant financial relationships.
October 29, 2020
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Anal cancer on the rise in women, people older than 50

Source:

Raed A. P0399. Presented at: The American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting (Virtual). Oct. 26-28, 2020.

Disclosures: Raed reports no relevant financial relationships.
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The incidence of anal cancer among women and those older than 50 years rose significantly from 2001 to 2016, according to a poster presented at the American College of Gastroenterology annual meeting.

“People need to know that [anal cancer (AC)] is a preventable disease. Our research shows that AC incidence is increasing in the Unites States population and especially among the population 50 years or older. The public should be made aware that both [sexes] are at higher risk for this cancer, but [women] are more so than the [men],” Anas Raed, MD, of Augusta University, said in a press release. “Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is the key to eradicate this cancer. It is alarming to know that more than 50% of U.S. adults are not vaccinated against HPV. Therefore, it is imperative that patients should be educated and encouraged to discuss HPV vaccination with their primary care physicians.”

Raed and colleagues used the National Program of Cancer Registries along with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results to find all the cases of anal cancer diagnosed from 2001 to 2016. They identified the cases via ICD and calculated the annual percent change in incidence adjusted by age.

Investigators found 91,679 cases of anal cancer from 2001 to 2016, with 74,573 (81.3%) cases in those 50 years or older. Makeup of the cases were majority women (62.5%) and white people (86.7%). Types of anal cancer fell mostly in squamous cell carcinoma (82.5%).

An increase in the incidence rate of anal cancer was noted with an annual percent change of 2.1% (95% CI, 1.7-2.5). Cases in the age 50 years and older group had an annual percent change of 2.8% (95% CI, 2.5-3.1), but the same change was not seen in those younger than 50 years. Individuals older than 50 years had an increased incidence of squamous cell carcinoma with an annual percent change of 3.7% (95% CI, 3.3-4), whereas adenocarcinoma demonstrated a decreased incidence with annual percent change of –1.3% (95% CI, –1.9 to –0.7).

In this older age group, women showed a higher risk than men with annual percent change of 3.3% (95% CI, 3-3.6) vs. 2.1% (95% CI, 1.6-2.5). In this age group, white patients had a higher risk than Black patients with annual percent change of 3% (95% CI, 2.7-3.4) vs. 2.1% (95% CI, 1.6-2.5). The annual percent change was the greatest in the age group 55 years to 59 years at 4.3% (95% CI, 3.6-5). Among individuals younger than 50 years, the group between 45 years and 49 years was the only group who had an upward trend in the cancer with an annual percent change of 1% (95% CI, –0.4 to 2.5).

“While individuals 50 years or older have an increased incidence of squamous cell carcinoma, whereas adenocarcinoma demonstrated a decreased incidence. Both [sexes] were at risk for this cancer, but [women] are at a higher risk than the [men],” Raed said. “We stress that we need to adopt a stringent preventive, screening and surveillance strategies. This is critical to reverse these concerning trends and hopefully diminish the disparities in this preventable disease.”