Perspective from Carole Macaron, MD
Source:

Singh KN, et al. S0265. Presented at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting (Virtual). Oct 23-28.

Disclosures: Singh reports no relevant financial disclosures.
October 27, 2020
2 min read
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Statins linked to 20% lower colorectal cancer risk

Perspective from Carole Macaron, MD
Source:

Singh KN, et al. S0265. Presented at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting (Virtual). Oct 23-28.

Disclosures: Singh reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Statins used in the general population conferred a 20% risk reduction for colorectal cancer with a possibly larger impact in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, according to an analysis presented during ACG 2020 Virtual.

“We found that statin use was associated with a significant risk reduction of colorectal cancer in the non-IBD population whereby the risk reduction was 20%,” Kevin N. Singh, MD, from NYU Langone Medical Center, said during his virtual presentation. “We found that statin users were noted to have a 60% lower risk of colorectal cancer in the IBD population.”

Singh and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of 52 studies that included 17 cohort studies, 27 case-control studies and eight randomized clinical trials, all totaling more than 11 million patients.

In the non-IBD population, the pooled CRC OR was 0.8 (95% CI, 0.73-0.88) and researchers found no publication bias. In a separate analysis, Singh said the risk for CRC with statin use in the IBD population was 60% lower than in the general population. This analysis included five observational studies with more than 15,000 patients with IBD. Pooled OR was 0.4 (95% CI, 0.19-0.86), though the researchers did identify a publication bias. Singh said formal studies need to be performed.

“The risk reduction of statins may actually be greater than previously reported. Prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm this association and future studies should also focus on determining whether the chemopreventive effects of statins differ between ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease patients,” he said.