Gastro Psych Blog

Gastro Psych Blog

Biography: Keefer is a GI health psychologist and director of Psychobehavioral Research at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She serves on the Healio Gastroenterology Peer Perspective Board.
February 07, 2020
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Welcome to When in Rome: Healio’s Gastro Psych Blog

Biography: Keefer is a GI health psychologist and director of Psychobehavioral Research at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She serves on the Healio Gastroenterology Peer Perspective Board.
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Laurie Keefer
Laurie Keefer

In an ongoing effort to keep up with the rapidly expanding field of psychogastroenterology and the latest updates on research, science and clinical practice advocacy, Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease proudly presents “When in Rome: Gastro Psych Blog.” This new resource aims to give practicing physicians more insight into the scientific and clinical intersection of gastroenterology and psychology.

Every month, Emily Edlynn, PhD, and a panel of experts will discuss the burgeoning field of gastropsych as the specialty continues to evolve and shape how providers view the psychological components of GI conditions. By bringing together research, science and clinical practice advocacy, the blog aims to further the growth of this exciting specialty and better inform psychologists, psychiatrists and gastroenterologists about the benefits of incorporating GastroPsych into practice.

Contributor Laurie Keefer, PhD, a GI health psychologist and director of Psychobehavioral Research at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease that mental health must be considered at the earliest parts of treatment and not just in patients who struggle to get their disease under control.

“Unfortunately, a lot of times the focus is so much on getting the inflammation down and getting the disease under control, which is critical,” she said. “But, earlier effective intervention on these other factors is also something that we need to strive for.”

Remember to keep an eye on this space to find updates on what exactly a GI psychologist does and how they fit into a practice, or how to take an atypical approach to treating conditions like functional dyspepsia.

Check out our first post by Edlynn, who introduces GastroPsych and how the field has grown in recent years.