By the Numbers

By the Numbers

November 16, 2019
3 min read
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ACG highlights: 7 interventional endoscopy updates

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Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease presents a list of some of the top stories that included some of the top research and discussions pertaining to interventional endoscopy presented at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting

Our readers were most interested in advancements in single use scopes, as well as research that demonstrated an effective way to reduce upper GI rebleeds.

Low-residue diet improves bowel prep, patient tolerance

Patients who adhered to a single-day, low-residue diet prior to colonoscopy had a better bowel preparation and reported better tolerance compared with a clear liquid diet, according to study results presented at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting.

Jason Samarasena, MD, FACG, of the University of California, Irvine Medical Center, said that patients often say that diet restrictions and the bowel prep process can deter them from undergoing colonoscopy. READ MORE.

VIDEO: Techniques, technology to improve adenoma detection

In this exclusive video from the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting, Tonya R. Kaltenbach, MD, MS, FACG, from the University of California, San Francisco and the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, discusses how physicians can improve their adenoma detection rate.

“We play a huge role in findings these polyps, and we do that through several things within the procedure,” Kaltenbach told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. “We do it with our mindset, we do it with the techniques and we do it with our technology.” READ MORE.

VIDEO: Determining what age to start, stop colon cancer screening is a ‘big controversy’

In this exclusive video from the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting, Aasma Shaukat, MD, MPH, FACG, professor of medicine at University of Minnesota and GI Section Chief at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center, discusses a major debate in colorectal cancer screening and surveillance.

“One of the biggest controversies that we are dealing with is what age should we start colon cancer screening, and at what age should we stop,” Shaukat told Healio Gastroenterology and Liver Disease. READ MORE.

Experts report good performance of single use duodenoscopes

New, single use duodenoscopes received overall good marks for use in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography from a group of expert endoscopists, according to study results presented at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting.

V. Raman Muthusamy, MD, FACG, from the University of California, Los Angeles, said these new scopes are still in the early stages, but the FDA recently recommended that health care centers start to transition to duodenoscopes with disposable components to address the potential for bacterial transmission. READ MORE.

Over-the-scope clips reduce upper GI rebleeding

Patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding treated with large, over-the-scope hemoclips experienced lower rates of rebleeding and severe complications, according to data presented at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting.

According to Dennis M. Jensen, MD, FACG, of the David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, recurrent bleeding from peptic ulcers and Dieulafoy’s lesions is common, and high-risk patients who receive standard treatment have a rebleeding rate of more than 26%. READ MORE.

Underwater endoscopic mucosal resection viable alternative to conventional treatment

Underwater endoscopic mucosal resection was a safe and effective alternative to conventional resection in patients with large laterally spreading colorectal tumors, according to study results presented at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting.

David P. Lee, MD, MPH, of the University of California, Irvine Medical Center, said the technique involves replacing luminal air insufflation with water immersion, which allows for resection without the need for submucosal injections. Although previous studies have looked at the efficacy of underwater endoscopic mucosal resection (UEMR), they have mostly been restricted to cases series and retrospective analyses. READ MORE.

VIDEO: Endoscopic therapy for GERD in the ‘best position it’s ever been’

In this exclusive video from the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Meeting, Ronnie Fass, MD, FACG, medical director of the digestive health center at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland, discusses endoscopic therapies for patients with GERD.

Fass presented the “pro” argument in the session titled, “Do endoscopic anti-reflux therapies have a tole in 2019?” READ MORE.