American Association of Clinical Endocrinology Annual Meeting

American Association of Clinical Endocrinology Annual Meeting

Source:

Fleseriu M, et al. Levoketoconazole in the treatment of endogenous Cushing’s syndrome: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal study. Presented at: American Association of Clinical Endocrinology Annual Scientific and Clinical Conference; May 12-14, 2022; San Diego.

Disclosures: Shimon reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full poster for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
May 12, 2022
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LOGICS: Levoketoconazole improves cortisol control in endogenous Cushing’s syndrome

Source:

Fleseriu M, et al. Levoketoconazole in the treatment of endogenous Cushing’s syndrome: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal study. Presented at: American Association of Clinical Endocrinology Annual Scientific and Clinical Conference; May 12-14, 2022; San Diego.

Disclosures: Shimon reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full poster for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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SAN DIEGO — Compared with placebo, levoketoconazole improved cortisol control and serum cholesterol levels for adults with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome, according to results from the LOGICS study presented here.

Safety and efficacy of levoketoconazole (Recorlev, Xeris Biopharma) for treatment of Cushing’s syndrome were established in the pivotal phase 3, open-label SONICS study. The phase 3, double-blind LOGICS study sought to demonstrate the drug specificity of levoketoconazole in normalizing mean urinary free cortisol (mUFC) level.

LOGICS randomized withdrawal study results

“Treatment with levoketoconazole benefited patients with Cushing’s syndrome of different etiologies and a wide range in UFC elevations at baseline by frequent normalization of UFC,” Ilan Shimon, MD, professor at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel Aviv University and associate dean of the Faculty of Medicine at Rabin Medical Center and director of the Institute of Endocrinology in Israel, told Healio. “This is a valuable Cushing’s study as it includes a placebo-controlled randomized withdrawal phase.”

LOGICS participants were drawn from a cohort of 79 adults with Cushing’s syndrome with a baseline mUFC at least 1.5 times the upper limit of normal who participated in a single-arm, open-label titration and maintenance phase of approximately 14 to 19 weeks. Researchers randomly assigned 39 of those participants plus five from SONICS who had normalized mUFC levels on stable doses of levoketoconazole for at least 4 weeks to continue to receive the medication (n = 22) or to receive placebo with withdrawal of the medication (n = 22) for 8 weeks. At the end of the withdrawal period, all participants received levoketoconazole for 8 more weeks. Primary endpoint was proportion of participants who lost mUFC normalization during the randomized withdrawal period, and secondary endpoints included proportion with normalized mUFC and changes in total and LDL cholesterol at the end of the restoration period.

During the withdrawal period, 95.5% of participants receiving placebo vs. 40.9% of those receiving levoketoconazole experienced loss of mUFC response, for a treatment difference of –54.5% (95% CI, –75.7 to –27.4; P = .0002). At the end of the withdrawal period, 4.5% of participants receiving placebo vs. 50% of those receiving levoketoconazole maintained normalized mUFC, for a treatment difference of 45.5% (95% CI, 19.2-67.9; P = .0015).

Among participants who had received placebo and lost mUFC response, 60% regained normalized mUFC at the end of the restoration period.

During the withdrawal period, participants in the placebo group had increases of 0.9 mmol/L in total cholesterol and 0.6 mmol/L in LDL cholesterol vs. decreases of 0.04 mmol/L (P = .0004) and 0.006 mmol/L (P = .0056), respectively, for the levoketoconazole group. The increases seen in the placebo group were reversed when participants restarted the medication.

The most common adverse events with levoketoconazole were nausea (29%) and hypokalemia (26%). Prespecified adverse events of special interest were liver-related (10.7%), QT interval prolongation (10.7%) and adrenal insufficiency (9.5%).

“This study has led to the FDA decision to approve levoketoconazole for the treatment of Cushing’s syndrome after surgical failure or if surgery is not possible,” Shimon said.