Perspective from Scott Kahan, MD, MPH
Perspective from W. Timothy Garvey, MD, FACE
Source:

Press release

Disclosures: Aronne is an investigator in the SURMOUNT-1 trial.
April 28, 2022
2 min read
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SURMOUNT-1: Adults achieve weight loss of 16% or more at 72 weeks with tirzepatide

Perspective from Scott Kahan, MD, MPH
Perspective from W. Timothy Garvey, MD, FACE
Source:

Press release

Disclosures: Aronne is an investigator in the SURMOUNT-1 trial.
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Adults with overweight or obesity taking the once-weekly GIP/GLP-1 receptor agonist tirzepatide achieved a mean weight loss of at least 16% at 72 weeks, according to topline results from the SURMOUNT-1 clinical trial.

In a phase 3 trial with 2,539 participants, tirzepatide (Eli Lilly) met both primary endpoints for mean percentage change in body weight from baseline and percentage of participants with a 5% reduction in body weight compared with placebo. Adults randomly assigned to receive tirzepatide had a mean weight loss of 16% with 5 mg, 21.4% with 10 mg, and 22.5% with 15 mg compared with a 2.4% mean weight loss for those assigned placebo. Of those assigned tirzepatide, 89% achieved a weight loss of at least 5% compared with 28% in the placebo group.

Louis J. Aronne, MD, FACP, DABOM
Aronne is the Sanford I. Weill Professor of Metabolic Research at Weill Cornell Medicine at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and investigator in the SURMOUNT-1 trial.

“This study shows that highly significant weight loss, in line with what is achieved with surgical procedures, can be achieved with tirzepatide,” Louis J. Aronne, MD, FACP, DABOM, the Sanford I. Weill Professor of Metabolic Research at Weill Cornell Medicine at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and investigator in the SURMOUNT-1 trial, told Healio. “The mean BMI was about 38 kg/m2 to start and was reduced to about 30 kg/m2 with many subjects getting into the normal range.” 

Tirzepatide met all key secondary endpoints, with 55% of those receiving 10 mg and 63% of those receiving 15 mg achieving a body weight reduction of at least 20% compared with 1.3% of the placebo group. In an additional secondary endpoint analysis not controlled for type 1 error, 32% of those receiving 5 mg tirzepatide lost at least 20% of body weight, according to the release.

“For perspective, a 5% weight loss reduces the risk of developing diabetes by 50%, and a 10% weight loss reduces it by 80%,” Aronne said. “Lap band produces about 17% weight loss, and sleeve gastrectomy 25% mean weight loss. The gap between diets and bariatric surgery is being filled by medical therapy.”

The safety and tolerability profile for tirzepatide was similar to that those of other incretin-based therapies approved for obesity treatment. Most side effects were mild to moderate; the most common were nausea, diarrhea, constipation and vomiting.

Participants with prediabetes at the start of the trial will remain enrolled for an additional 104 weeks beyond the initial 72-week trial period to evaluate the impact of body weight and potential differences in type 2 diabetes progression with tirzepatide compared with placebo.

The SURMOUNT-1 results will be presented at an upcoming medical meeting and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal, according to the release. Additional studies are ongoing.