Perspective from Nanette Santoro, MD
Source:

Press release

Disclosures: Astellas Pharma funded the SKYLIGHT studies.
February 19, 2021
2 min read
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Top-line results: Nonhormonal drug reduces menopausal hot flash severity

Perspective from Nanette Santoro, MD
Source:

Press release

Disclosures: Astellas Pharma funded the SKYLIGHT studies.
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Two phase 3 trials assessing an investigational oral, nonhormonal compound for the treatment of moderate to severe hot flashes in menopausal women met their coprimary endpoints, according to top-line data from the SKYLIGHT studies.

The SKYLIGHT 1 and SKYLIGHT 2 trials showed statistically significant reductions from baseline to weeks 4 and 12 in the frequency and severity of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms for women assigned once-daily fezolinetant (Astella Pharma) 30 mg and 45 mg compared with placebo, according to a press release form Astella Pharma.

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Serious treatment-related adverse events occurred in less than 2% of trial participants, with headache as the most common adverse event.

“We are encouraged by these results for fezolinetant, which mark the first phase 3 data in a new category of selective neurokinin-3 (NK3)-targeted treatments for moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms,” Salim Mujais, MD, senior vice president and therapeutic area head for medical specialties at Astellas, said in the release. “Vasomotor symptoms can add a significant burden and impact quality of life for women. We are hopeful that with fezolinetant, we will be able to deliver a novel nonhormonal treatment option.”

As Healio previously reported, data from a phase 2b study demonstrated that menopausal women experiencing moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms reported fewer weekly hot flashes and reduced symptom severity across doses of fezolinetant compared with women assigned placebo. Those findings, which also showed women assigned fezolinetant experienced improvements in patient-reported outcomes, were presented at the 2019 North American Menopause Society annual meeting.

SKYLIGHT 1 and SKYLIGHT 2 are ongoing double-blind, placebo-controlled studies evaluating 30 mg and 45 mg fezolinetant administered once daily for the first 12 weeks, followed by 40-week active treatment extension periods.

Astellas said detailed results will be submitted for publication and for consideration at upcoming medical meetings.