February 16, 2020
1 min read
Save

Effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals extend to obesity, osteoporosis, IQ and beyond

You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Although causality is difficult to prove definitively, mounting evidence suggests adverse health consequences of endocrine-disrupting among humans. Recent research links these ubiquitous compounds to pediatric obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis and more.

Chemicals in cosmetics increase obesity risk for children exposed in utero

Children may be more likely to develop overweight or obesity if their mothers are exposed to high levels of paraben while pregnant, according to findings published in Nature Communications.

READ

Phthalates from plastics, personal care products influence testosterone levels among men

Urinary biomarkers that detect the presence of phthalates were associated with testosterone concentrations among a representative sample of U.S. men, according to findings published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

READ

Experts warn PFAS endocrine-disrupting chemicals may drive obesity, osteoporosis

A class of endocrine-disrupting chemicals known as PFAS may work as an “environmental trigger” to drive multiple adverse endocrine health effects, including obesity, thyroid dysfunction and low bone mineral density, although researchers caution that more studies on potential associations are needed.

READ

Endocrine Disruptors 2019 
Although causality is difficult to prove definitively, mounting evidence suggests adverse health consequences of endocrine-disrupting among humans. Recent research links these ubiquitous compounds to pediatric obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis and more.
Source: Adobe Stock

VIDEO: Exposure to common chemicals may lead to obesity, diabetes

In this video exclusive, Abby Fleisch, MD, MPH, attending physician in pediatric endocrinology and diabetes at the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation at Maine Medical Center, describes how exposure to common perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances — better known as the endocrine-disrupting chemicals PFAS — is associated with obesity, diabetes and high cholesterol levels.

READ

Prenatal exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals tied to lower IQ in boys

Early prenatal exposure to a mixture of endocrine-disrupting chemicals found in common consumer products is associated with lower intellectual functioning among boys at age 7 years, according to findings published in Environment International.

READ

Prenatal BPA exposure linked to lower lung function in children

Children with higher prenatal exposure to bisphenol A may be more likely to have lower lung function and experience wheezing.

READ

Chemicals replacing BPA in plastics, cans increase childhood obesity risk

Children with greater levels of bisphenol S and bisphenol F in their urine are more likely to have obesity when compared with children with lower levels of the chemicals, according to findings published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

READ