Source/Disclosures
Source: Männistö T. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013;[published online ahead of print May 29].
May 30, 2013
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Thyroid disease linked to preeclampsia, preterm birth

Source/Disclosures
Source: Männistö T. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013;[published online ahead of print May 29].
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Recent data suggest that thyroid diseases are associated with an increased risk for several adverse outcomes among pregnant women, including preeclampsia and preterm birth. These women also were more likely to be admitted to the ICU, according to NIH researchers.

“In the United States, at least 80,000 pregnant women each year have thyroid diseases,” Tuija Männistö, MD, PhD, of the NIH Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), said in a press release. “These women are at increased risk of having serious adverse pregnancy outcomes, including hypertension and preterm birth. They also have a higher rate of labor inductions and other birth interventions.”

Männistö and colleagues aimed to examine the complications of pregnancy linked to common or uncommon thyroid disease by analyzing single pregnancies (n=223,512) from the retrospective cohort, Consortium on Safe Labor (2002-2008).

According to data, primary hypothyroidism was associated with an increased risk for preeclampsia (OR=1.47; 99% CI, 1.20-1.81), superimposed preeclampsia (OR=2.25; 99% CI, 1.53-3.29), gestational diabetes (OR=1.57; 99% CI, 1.33-1.86), preterm birth (OR=1.34; 99% CI, 1.17-1.53), induction (OR=1.15; 99% CI, 1.04-1.28), cesarean section (pre-labor OR=1.31; 99% CI, 1.11-1.54; after spontaneous labor OR=1.38; 99% CI, 1.14-1.66) and ICU admission (OR=2.08; 99% CI, 1.04-4.15).

The researchers wrote that iatrogenic hypothyroidism was associated with an increased likelihood of placental abruption (OR=2.89; 99% CI, 1.14-7.36), breech presentation (OR=2.09; 99% CI, 1.07-4.07) and cesarean section after spontaneous labor (OR=2.05; 99% CI, 1.01-4.16).

Furthermore, the researchers wrote that hyperthyroidism was linked to an increased risk for preeclampsia (OR=1.78; 99% CI, 1.08-2.94), superimposed preeclampsia (OR=3.64; 99% CI, 1.82-7.29), preterm birth (OR=1.81; 99% CI, 1.32-2.49), induction (OR=1.40; 99% CI, 1.06-1.86) and ICU admission (OR=3.70; 99% CI, 1.16-11.80).

These findings highlight a need for further research to determine whether women with appropriate treatment have a greater risk for developing pregnancy complications caused by the disease or whether treatment can stop adverse outcomes.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.