Disclosures: Ellis reports consulting for various manufacturers of psoriasis therapeutics. Please see the study for all others authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
March 08, 2022
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Epicardial adipose tissue volumes elevated in men with psoriasis

Disclosures: Ellis reports consulting for various manufacturers of psoriasis therapeutics. Please see the study for all others authors’ relevant financial disclosures.
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Epicardial adipose tissue volumes were greater in men with psoriasis compared with controls, according to a study.

“Patients with psoriasis have elevated risk of coronary artery disease,” Charles N. Ellis, MD, of the department of dermatology at the University of Michigan Medical School, and colleagues wrote.

In the cross-sectional study, the researchers investigated whether patients with severe psoriasis have larger epicardial adipose tissue volumes (EAT-V) that may put them at risk for cardiovascular outcomes.

The analysis included 14 men and 11 women with severe psoriasis, along with a matched cohort of five men and 11 women who served as controls. Eligible participants were aged 34 to 55 years and did not have known coronary artery disease or diabetes mellitus. The presence or absence of EAT-V was determined using non-contrast CT scanning.

Results showed greater mean EAT-V levels in the psoriasis arm compared with controls (P = .04).

No statistically significant difference was found among women. In men, however, the EAT-V elevation was significantly greater in the psoriasis group compared with controls (P = .03). The trend toward elevated EAT-V in men with psoriasis persisted even in an analysis that adjusted for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (P = .05).

The researchers noted the single-center nature of the findings as a potential limitation.

“Males with psoriasis without known coronary disease or diabetes had greater EAT-V than controls,” the researchers concluded. “EAT-V may be an early identifier of those at increased risk for cardiovascular events.”