American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

Source:

Glaser K, et al. Optical coherence tomography guided and temperature-controlled hyperthermic treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery meeting; Nov. 19-21, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Research devices were provided by Michelson Diagnostics Ltd. and Sciton Aesthetic & Medical Lasers.
December 13, 2021
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OCT-guided hyperthermic treatment noninvasive option for superficial basal cell carcinoma

Source:

Glaser K, et al. Optical coherence tomography guided and temperature-controlled hyperthermic treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery meeting; Nov. 19-21, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Research devices were provided by Michelson Diagnostics Ltd. and Sciton Aesthetic & Medical Lasers.
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OCT-guided and temperature-controlled hyperthermic treatment could be a safe, noninvasive alternative to surgical tumor removal in superficial basal cell carcinoma, according to a presentation of preliminary data.

“The purpose of this study is to optimize hyperthermic treatment of BCC with laser technology under the guidance of optical coherence tomography and near-infrared temperature monitoring,” Erica G. Baugh, BA, a medical student at University of California, Irvine, said at the American Society for Dermatology Surgery virtual meeting.

Researchers plan to enroll 40 subjects in the study, of which six have already begin treatment with Controlled Hyperthermic and Mapped Protocol (CHAMP).

Subjects with superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC) on the trunk or upper extremities, which have been biopsy-proven, are imaged for tumor definition, plus 5 mm margin with OCT. They then are treated with long-pule 1064 nm ND:YAG laser as the skin’s surface temperature is monitored with a near-infrared thermal camera.

Follow-up between 8 and 12 weeks is conducted to assess tumor clearance or treat residual tumors. Of those who have completed 8 weeks of follow-up, treated areas were well healed and did not have scarring or complications.

This preliminary data is promising, but the study’s authors believe more data and standardized laser treatments for sBCCs is needed for optimal use.

“CHAMP for the treatment of BCC is a noninvasive alternative to traditional surgical tumor removal,” Baugh said.