American Academy of Dermatology Meeting

American Academy of Dermatology Meeting

Source:

Elsanadi R, et al. Caring for skin during a pandemic: Acute facial skin changes following mask-wearing. Presented at: AAD VMX 2021; April 23-25, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
May 05, 2021
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Pandemic-related mask wearing increased rhytides, acne

Source:

Elsanadi R, et al. Caring for skin during a pandemic: Acute facial skin changes following mask-wearing. Presented at: AAD VMX 2021; April 23-25, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
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During the COVID-19 pandemic, while mask wearing was prevalent, increases in acne, erythema and rhytides were reported, according to a poster presented at AAD VMX 2021.

“Current literature reports an increase in facial skin temperature, acne flares, discomfort and adverse skin reactions with mask wearing,” Rachel Elsanadi, BS, and colleagues wrote. In addition, there has been “public concern of rhytides and ‘maskne,’ a term describing mask-associated acne flares.”

During the COVID-19 pandemic, while mask wearing was prevalent, increases in acne, erythema and rhytides were reported.

The prospective cohort triple-arm study included 30 individuals who wore fabric, paper or N95 masks for 6 hours before completing a survey.

The survey asked about facial dryness, itching, acne, erythema, texture, oiliness and irritation before and after wearing the mask. Cherry Imaging software was also used to measure erythema index, acne index, and rhytide area and depth.

All participants reported an increase in irritation, while an increase in pruritis was reported in those wearing paper and N95 masks. Oiliness was increased in those using fabric masks.

Imaging showed rhytide area and depth significantly increased, especially around the chin, in those wearing N95 masks compared with those in paper masks.

“All masks quantifiably increased erythema, acne and rhytides,” the authors wrote. “Subjects reported significant increases in redness and acne factors (oiliness, irritation and itching), paralleling the objective findings.”