American Academy of Dermatology Meeting

American Academy of Dermatology Meeting

Source:

Rosenblatt A, et al. Virtual group visits for reducing psychosocial distress & racial disparities in pediatric vitiligo & alopecia areata. Presented at: AAD VMX 2021; April 23-25, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
April 25, 2021
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Group visits for patients with vitiligo, alopecia areata benefit psychosocial health

Source:

Rosenblatt A, et al. Virtual group visits for reducing psychosocial distress & racial disparities in pediatric vitiligo & alopecia areata. Presented at: AAD VMX 2021; April 23-25, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
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Children with vitiligo or alopecia areata, as well as their parents or caregivers, can benefit from meeting with others with the same condition, according to a poster presented at AAD VMX 2021.

“Pediatric vitiligo and alopecia areata (AA) are cutaneous autoimmune conditions with consequences for children’s and caregivers’ mental health and self-esteem,” Adena Rosenblatt, MD, PhD, and Natalia N. Khosla, MSc, of University of Chicago, wrote. “Black patients are affected at the highest rates by AA and the highest visible severity by vitiligo, resulting in greater psychosocial distress than other racial groups.”

The study included 30 patients aged 5 to 16 years with vitiligo (12 patients, 15 parents) or AA (18 patients, 18 parents). Fifty-nine percent of patients were girls; 63.3% were Black, 23.3% were “Latinx,” 6.7% were South Asian and 6.7% were Middle Eastern.

Patients and parents were surveyed via Zoom before and after eight virtual group visits.

Before the group sessions, 90% of patients and 85% of parents reported knowing no one or few other individuals with the same condition, and 67% of patients and 70% of parents reported having no one or few people to talk to about the condition. After meeting with the group, those numbers decreased to 42% of patients and 18% of parents.

In addition, the idea of a group visit was thought to be helpful by 67% of parents and 37% of patients before the visits occurred but rose to 82% of parents and 61% of patients afterward.

“The sessions exceeded expectations. Parents and patients felt they were more helpful than predicted,” the authors wrote. “The sessions seem to fulfill an unmet need, accessible in the virtual format. Most parents and patients reported they would attend again.”